scrape and paint or reside


I have a small 75 year old house that is in need of repainting. The wooden clapboards are in good condition except that they are covered in alligatored paint. I tried scraping with a heat gun but it is slow going (though it works). Is there any other way of stripping paint quickly? My other option is to side with fiber cement boards. I just hate vinyl. Materials will run about $3500. (My house is small).
Anybody ever scrape and paint an old house? Was it worth it? How about fiber cement boards?
Thanks for the help.
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Without seeing its condition who can say. Get bids. I prefer wood, its real.
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I have done part of my big old house. I have settled on a radiant electric heater that softens the paint so it can be easilg stripped. I found mine at a garage sale. See what it looks like here -\\ (Amazon.com product link shortened)63195302/ref=sr_1_8/102-8807541-7733751?ie=UTF8&s=hi
I hold it very close for about 4-8 seconds, then scrape that area. Sometimes I can move it gradually left, scrape behind it, and once the paint starts peeling you can just pull on it and it will peel off. But that is best case. I typically use a 3" putty knife as my scraper. I then run over it quickly with a scraper of sander to get a smooth surface.
This does work best when there is a thich layer of paint coats. It is still slow, but the result looks like new siding. As you discover the best scrapers and technique for your surface, it does get faster.
Bob
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With both of these methods, you must be careful to be sure that your paint is not lead paint. The heat involved can be high enough to create volatile lead vapors if these methods are used with lead paint. There is a lower temperature infrared paint remover that is supposed to be lead safe, I'm thinking of giving it a try.
Cheers, Wayne
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In all old houses, somewhere there is a layer of lead paint. I have heard about the infrared systems, but I'm not sure if they really work. When I uses the heat gun, I heat the paint just enough for it to bubble. I don't know if this releases lead or if you really need to get it burning.
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jimbob wrote:

The infrared systems work but they're not cheap...esp with all the producitivity accessories
http://www.silentpaintremover.com /
http://www.eco-strip.com/?refH=goog&t=prm
according their info
"Does not cause lead to be released in the form of plumbic gases from the paint when operated properly"
cheers Bob
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I'm not sure how this would be any different than the one I use, which is considerably cheaper.
Bob
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Bob F wrote:

I agree they appear functionally identical......hopefully the higher priced one has better longevity or warranty.
Like a Master heat gun vs a Harbor Freight unit
but if the paint remover is for occasional use (or one job) the cheaper one is probably a better value.
cheers Bob
btw I did run out & buy one of these things
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work.
You bought the expensive one? Please let us know how it works.
Bob
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Bob F wrote:

Ooops! I missed typed....I meant to say
btw I didn't run out & buy one of these things
too spendy to me
cheers Bob
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althiough the OP hates vnyl siding at resale time it would be a real selling point, buyers love low no maintence......
just something to think about providing its not a historic structure or something similiar....
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I find it cheap looking. I am happy with my real wood on my 70 year old house. After stripping and re-painting, it's beautiful.
If they didn't put that awful wood grain look on vinyl and aluminum, it would look a lot better.
Bob
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Can be done. Worth it? Very subjective. If the house has some historic value, yes. At my age, low or no maintenance takes priority and siding will outlast me.
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wrote:

http://www.paintshaver.com / This works really well but takes a bit of practice to avoid gouging, regardless of the hype. When you're done, prime with a long oil primer then top coat with a quality latex and you'll have many years of service. BTDT.
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