Scotts Weed Control Fertilizer Killed Our Lawn!! HELP!!!

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Yes, on the back of the Scotts "Weed Control" bag, its says to have a setting of 5 and 1/2 for the Scotts Accugreen Drop Spreader, which is the one that we have, so thats what we had it set at, 5.5.
Also, I believe that our grass is mostly made up of Tall Fescue and Kentucky Bluegrass. And yes, my husband put the fertilizer down around 10:30 am in the morning, and when we went to look at the lawn at 7:00 am the next morning, all the grass was Yellow!!!!!
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On Jul 2, 8:26 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

That doesnt mean its not actualy set to 6.5, there is a measurement to calibrate it, call Scotts.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

The prrooof of the puuuding is to take the number of bags you used, measure the area you spread them over and _CALCULATE_THE_ACTUAL_RATE_.
Whatever it was, it was obviously too much for the conditions.
Again, chill...time will heal even this wound. :)
Not to mention there's nothing (practical) you can do to undo what's been done, anyway. Continuing to water copiously may help speed up the process slightly...
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

And btw, if the spreader were accurately putting out the recommended amount, after going over the area you say elsewhere the size of the lot is, you should have spread no more than a bag of material.
If it was only one pass to put the two bags down, then the spreader is obviously put out double what it was supposed to have done; else the mistake was going over the same area twice at the full-strength setting thereby putting on twice the recommended amount at the recommended rate per pass.
Either way, not determining ahead of time how large the area is in comparison to the amount of product to use was a major blunder.
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On Jul 1, 2:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

I think you did something wrong, ive never seen grass go brown overnight, in weeks yes but not overnight.
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(MICHELLE H.) wrote:

I'm in upstate NY and my entire lawncare consists of mowing the acreage every 10 days (in very dry years every 18-19). In 25 years we have never put down any "products" and we have NEVER watered anything except a newly planted tree. It rains, we mow. That's it. It's green, lush, and never needs watering. The only problem we've ever had with the lawn is mole holes early in the Spring, and the cats take care of that in about a week. There is a fairly new McMansion up the road (closest neighbor whose lawn we can see) and these people have had a brown lawn since they built the place. They use a lawn service that puts out those little flags (caution, toxic to all life forms, etc.) and they cut the grass at least once a week. They also cut it much too short. Even this year, when it's been raining almost every day, their lawn is brown and patchy. I say stay away from doing ANYTHING to the lawn and you'll be fine. Of course, depending on your location, YMMV.
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True, most lawn treatment schedules are made to treat your wallet.
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h wrote:

Grass gets a little tall, but he is usually the only one in the neighborhood with GREEN lawn.
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Exactly. And cutting it too short is a real problem as well.
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wrote:

leaving the grass a little taller also reduces development of weeds.
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I don't know the actual square feet of the lawn, but do know that it is 0.11 acres, and we used 2 full bags of 5,000 square foot Scotts "Weed Control" fertilizer.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

There are 43,560 square feet in an acre. 0.11 acres = 4,792 square feet.
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After subtracting a reasonable allowance for the footprint of the house, garage, driveway, sidewalks, etc., that means they spread 10,000 square feet worth of fertilizer on about 3,000 square feet of lawn. The results should not have been a surprise.
The fertilizer is not to blame, Michelle. You and your husband are.
You should never have bought two bags of the stuff in the first place. One is more than enough for such a small lawn.
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The entire yard/house is on 0.11 acres. The property measurements for our entire lot/yard is 50 feet x 100 feet. We have 50 feet in front. 50 feet in back, and 100 feet on the sides of our property.
So thats it, its official, our Scotts Drop Spreader must have malfunctioned, and even though it was set at 5.5, it must have came out at like a 10 or 11!?
Well, I guess its going straight to the curb for trash pickup in a few days, and we have to invest in a new one!!!
Everyone says to invest in a "rotary type" spreader, but is a "rotary spreader" really that good for our SMALL lawn??? I always thought that drop spreaders were good for small lawns, and rotary spreaders are better for bigger lawns???
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

I don't remember what the setting number pertains to, but you still don't seem to be using the right calculation. First, if the entire lot, WITH HOUSE, is about 5000 sq. ft., you need to consider the lot size MINUS the area of the house, driveway, flowerbeds, etc.
If you take the actual area you covered, you will know how much you applied with the setting at 5.5. I would try, next time, setting it at about 1.5 and cover the lawn going both ways - small enough to repeat if needed as it is better to apply too little than too much. You may also want to avoid any fertilizer until your grass starts looking a little pale (not as deep green). A drop spreader might be better if you have hedges or flower beds that you don't want to throw herbicides into. Also, liquid herbicides or insecticides sometimes go on better with a hose-end sprayer, as you can hit only the areas that need it and you are done.
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On Thu, 2 Jul 2009 12:03:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

The only real advantage to rotary is that they cover more area faster. With substances that are hard to visually see when you put them down, the rotary will help prevent sharp lines where you miss. The drop is much more accurate - as long as you don't miss anyplace - then you get stripes.
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On Thu, 02 Jul 2009 13:49:04 -0400, Still Just Me...

..and burns on the turns.. unless one pays attention..
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

I'd say it's more likely it wasn't _really_ at the setting thought it was than there's anything fundamentally irreparable about it.
All the numbers are for are a starting guide -- you should _always_ start low and measure an area and calibrate-in the actual drop rate.
There's no guarantee if you toss this and spend the $$ the brand new one won't do the same if you don't pay attention to it more closely than apparently you and hubby have done...starting w/ figuring out how much you should actually use _before_ starting.
--
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On Thu, 2 Jul 2009 12:03:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

I gave the neighbor a good drop spreader.
I like this one for a small lawn.
pic:
http://www.acohardware.org/uploaded/images/Garden%20pages/handspreader.jpg
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

No, Michelle, the spreader didn't malfunction -- its *operator* malfunctioned. Two 5,000-sf bags is enough to treat 10,000 square feet. Your entire lot is only half that; subtract the house, garage, driveway, etc. and the lawn is maybe one-third that much.
The problem, plain and simple, is that you bought somewhere between two and three times as much fertilizer as you should have used, then applied it all.
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