Scott Fiore has a question hard water spots

Hi, We just moved into a new home. I don't think the previous owners ever cleaned the glass shower doors. Our shower doors seems to be etched with hard water stains. Nothing I have tried will remove them. Even CLR does not remove them. Any suggestions? Thanks! -Scott Fiore
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I am not trying to be "funny" when I suggest a water softener.
Your shower doors may be permanently damaged. In that case, replacement is your only option.
Since I have "always" enjoyed soft water, I have virtually no experience with hard water damage removal/mitigation products. You have already tried CLR, so I can't help in that regard.
As surprising as it may seem, simply converting to soft water may remove some of the crud you object to. The process takes a few weeks but it DOES happen.
Those that do not like soft water have never LIVED with it. While the slippery (slimy?) feel while washing your hands can be disconcerting, one gets used to it. Rest assured it is simply the soap doing more. The soap doesn't have to "overcome" water hardness.
We use significantly less laundry detergent which is "appreciated" by our clothes. Glassware comes out of the dish washer spotless, without the use of a rinse aid. The glassware is not cloudy and/or etched.
I realize that it is a big investment to convert to soft water. You would not be disappointed, though.
--
:)
JR

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I've tried everything there is. Nothing has worked. I think the best thing to do is replace the door, and use a squeegie on it after each shower.
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Scott Fiore wrote:

What material? For glass, I use 4-0 steel wool on the glass and if it isn't polished, the frames as well. If polished, not so great on the frames obviously.
If there is indeed an etching owing to some particular acidic composition, that would be unlikely to be able to actually remove as it would be in the surface itself, not on the surface.
--
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On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 23:36:03 -0800 (PST), Scott Fiore

I use white vinegar and a soft cloth (elbow grease) to remove calcium deposits.
You will not get the etches out of the glass...long term damage.
Oren --
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For lime from sprinklers on exterior windows, I have used single edge razor blades in a suitable holder. Keep the surface wet with a spray while scraping. It's a lot of work. Get the razor blades at the hardware store. .
SJF
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On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 23:36:03 -0800 (PST), Scott Fiore

Clean them with swimming pool acid. Take them outside and don't get the acid on yourself.
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