Score one for top loading washers

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... you can't dye fabric in a front loader since you must agitate the dye

...
bullshit. They don't fill to the level of the door.
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Maybe true, so little water not up to the door. But the front loader we used in during last few years in Middle East had a timer circuit that prevented the door from being opened. One 'work around' when one found it necessary to add something additional to the load was to unplug the machine and wait until the machine allowed the door to open. Add the item/s close the door and plug in. The timer switch would reset and away it would go. Thorough wash, rather slow and loads were smaller. Our living unit did not have a dryer and too dusty to dry outside! We added a large full size US made dryer afterwards and vented it outside; several front loader washes, plus anything hand washed and bung it into the dryer! But have to agree that the top loader much more suitable for dying. But then I can recall dying stuff in big saucepan on top of a gas stove, and stirring it with a wooden stick! At end of WWII my Dad modified and then dyed dark brown a pair of khaki ex-army pants that he wore for years as senior mathematics master at school. He did a good job on them too!
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One of the main advantages of front loaders is that they wash larger loads per cu. ft., like, 30% larger.
You can literally "stuff" a front loader. If you can cram a comforter in there, chances are it'll wash, as opposed to a top loader where it'll just get wet, soapy, and won't rinse for squat.
Commercial machines are measured by load capacity in pounds. I don't know why consumer-grade machines are rated by cu. ft. -----
- gpsman
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re: "It *might* save water. But it also won't take nearly a large a load as our old machine- so we do more loads."
I like to hear what you are comparing. It's a common understanding that most front loaders take comparable sized - or larger - loads as top loaders.
I found this at:
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/alerts/alt070.shtm
"Typically, front-loaders use less water from one-third to one-half the amount that top-loaders require"
Therefore you'd have to be doing 2 - 3 times as many loads to not be saving water. I be very suprised to hear that your front loader only fits half the amount of clothes as your old top loader - unless of course if you went from some kind of super-ginormous top loader to a mini apartment sized front loader.
You do know that you can fill a front loader all the way to the top of the drum right?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes I know. On my old washer I adjusted the load size sensor so it filled as high as it could without overflowing (it takes one overflow to learn the limit). All three load sizes then used more water but I very seldom did small loads. On my current washer that adjustment doesn't work as well, so if doing a load larger then it is supposed to handle, I'll hold the "load size" knob between medium and super and let it fill as high as it can without overflowing. Again, it takes on overflow to know it's limit. Has always worked great for me.
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Not that it matters, but my question wasn't for you...it was for Jim who claimed his front loader did smaller loads than his top loader.
Anyway, my washer is next to my utility sink. I keep a 4' length of garden hose with a spray nozzle near the sink for washing coolers, the dogs, etc.
When we had a top loader and I wanted to overfill it, I just ran more water into it from the hose. Yes, I had to be there for the rinse cycle also, but that was rarely an issue.
P.S. The short garden hose also goes camping with us. You can fill the 5 gallon water containers while they're on the ground instead of trying to hold them up under the gushing output of the campground spigots.
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 11:15:45 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Heck, that one triggered a memory of doing that at campsites when I was aged around 7 or 8. Good tip, as it was a right pain in the butt (I used to return with as much water on me as I got in the container I think :-)
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wrote:

You could carry 5 gallons of water when you were 7?
Were you the school yard bully or the protector of all things meeker?
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 13:17:06 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, just, with both hands...
These were Imperial (not US) gallons, so 50 pounds, which was about the same as a standard sack of potatoes, and we used to be able to move them around on the farm (just for the sake of trying, not because we were told to - funny the crap you see adults doing and try and emulate as a kid)
I'd never really thought about it being anything special before. Maybe it was just one of those mind over matter things... :-)

No, I was usually the one bending the rules, or getting in trouble when I got found out ;-)
Y'know I think I only ever got in a real fight once, and we both came out about even. Other than that, never got myself beaten up and never did any beating up either...
cheers
Jules
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On Mon, 2 Nov 2009 17:55:37 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
-snip-

My old one was a Whirlpool LSR7133KQO. My frontloader is a Frigidaire 6000 or 7000 series. I can't get to the washer- and though I have an ownersguide, a repair manual, an operating manual, and 3 other pdf's on my computer- the best I can do on a model is "6000 & 7000".
My comparison of load size is because I do the 'dump and wash'. The old washer could take my entire large hamper in a single gulp. I have to drag all the clothes up out of the hamper and into the door of the front loader. If the hamper is more than 3/4 full I can't cram all those clothes in there no matter what I do.

They both take up the same space- Actually the front loader takes up more because I put it on a pedestal to try to save some back-aches.

If I was a little more agile I'd stomp the clothes down-- trust me, I fill it.
Jim
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I have a Frigidaire GLTF2940ES, 3.5 cu ft capacity. It's my understanding that that's a true 3.5 cu ft since there is no agitator, as opposed to a 3.5 top loader where the agitator volume is not subtracted from the capacity specs.

But that doesn't address my comment. Unless you are doing 2 - 3 times the number of loads as before you have to be saving water since each load uses 1/3 to 1/2 less.
In fact, since you said earlier "If the hamper is more than 3/4 full..." which means that you're doing roughly 4 loads for every 3 that you used to do. At 1/3 to 1/2 the water savings per load, you are definitely saving water.

Now that's a sight I'd like to see! :-)

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When we first got our front loader (Neptune) I did notice a slight odor, like light mildew. We started adding a little baking soda to each load and it went away never to return. It has already payed for itself in propane, between the hot water and the dryer, washing clothes with my old setup was my second biggest user, after heating the house. We have had it for about 5 years & would replace it with another in a heartbeat. though the Fisher & Paykel top loader looks interesting if it will do the big stuff. We regularly do our king size comforters & it handles them with ease.
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mike wrote:

Long long ago in a far off laundry room I had a new top loader that smelled after it sat for days, sometimes a week unused. I ran it with a hell of a lot of chlorine bleach then always left the lid open often emptying it. It never smelled again. I can however see oneself bruising their knees on the open door of a front loader.
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