"Scabbing" window

I have some wooden windows that are rotting. One contractor wants to go through and replace them. Another wants to "scab" them. According to him that means taking out the bad part, milling a replacement and then "grafting" it on the good part. This has a couple of pluses, not the least of which is MUCh less cost and we also don't have to mess with restaining the insides since they were left intact. The home is about $400,000, so I have some concerns about matching the current windows outside and also that it might look, well "scabby". Any comments?
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 14:22:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote:

Hadn't heard the term "scabbing" before, but I've done this, and done well it's invisible. If the window exterior is painted the repairs are very easy to hide.
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Luke wrote:

Very routine operation for restoration work. Depending on the magnitude od the damage the wood stabilisers and epoxy repair materials can also do great things.
"PC Woody" brand has been very satisfactory to work with and is less expensive than most competing products I've seen...
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(Kurt Ullman)

I've never heard it used to describe repairing existing windows. I have heard it used to describe taking used windows and using them as replacements for your own.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

I've never heard it termed "scabbing", but replacing rotted sections of a window is not uncommon. If it is done properly, there should be no appearance issue whatsoever. Apply the spliced in pieces of wood, fill any small gaps with filler, prime and paint, and you will never know the difference.
Here is some more info:
http://tinyurl.com/7b5gt
Ken
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One other thing I will add to compare the two contractors. The guy who wants to replace all your windows is probably recommending that route because that's what he knows. He probably would be a *bad* contractor to go in and replace rotted sections with newly milled pieces. He knows that he can order new windows, and then show up and replace them all in one day, get his money, and then leave.
If I had to guess, I would say the guy who wants to only replace the rotted parts probably knows what he is doing and is willing to put extra time into doing a proper fix without making as much money on the deal. He will need to make up the new pieces of wood, go in and cut out the rotted sections, splice in the new pieces and then possibly put in an epoxy filler. Then let that dry, come back the next day to sand and prime, then come back again to paint (unless he was going to leave that to you if that wasn't part of the deal). He will probably take longer to do it right. If it was me, I would probably go with the selective replacement guy rather than the whole window replacement guy, regardless of the cost difference.
Ken
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I'm with Ken and Luke - it's not uncommon, and done well it's not noticeable. I don't think it'd be tough to match the current stuff, unless you have some pecule windows.
When I've seen it, it's usually rotted sills and trim. Some people do it well, some not so.
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go out and actually eyeball the work at a couple of places.
BTW: THanks to all who responded.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Certainly can't hurt if feasible...
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If it's feasible, that'd be great. Contractors shouldn't mind potential customers doing that, and hopefully the references are accomodating.
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 20:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote:
[snip]

Yes. If possible you might ask the guy doing the "scabbing" if he'll do one window to give you an idea how it'll look and if his work is good. He may not want to do that, however, as he'll likely want to set up on the job just once. Whichever you use, keep a sharp eye as the work progresses, be nice and chatty, offer drinks, etc., but don't be afraid to call a halt if it looks sloppy.
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