Sawzall: Milwaukee vs Hitachi vs ?

I'm looking to get a Sawzall type saw. My immediate use will be lots of tree trimming and cutting branches into small pieces to go to the curb. After that it will be diy around the house stuff. I'm not a professional contractor but I do like to get decent tools that will last and peform well.
So far I'm looking at:
1. Milwaukee 6509-22 http://tinyurl.com/akz3t which is the lowest Milwaukee model. Locally I can get it for $119. This has a 3/4 inch stroke
2. Hitachi CR13V http://tinyurl.com/82lrm which is Hitachi's lower end. Local price is $89. this has a 1 1/8 inch stroke.
I've looked at a Bosch but didn't see the need for the rotating collar (although the saw was comfortable to hold) The collar seems a gimmick that is more likely to break than be useful.
I've also looked at the 6 amp Makita JR3000 which I think costs about the same as the Milwaukee and thus didn't seem to be a good deal (I could be wrong).
Any opinions on what I should get? Are there others I should consider? Is the Milwaukee that much better than the Hitachi? Thanks in advance.
Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't get me wrong, I love my Milwaukee Sawsall, but I never consider it for trimming trees and/or branches. It is just too heavy.
Last year I purchased a Homelite cordless combo kit that included a branch trimmer (reciprocating saw on a pole), a small chain saw, and a hedge trimmer. They have all worked well. I was even able to cut off a 7" cherry log with the chain saw. The kit came with two batteries, one for the tool, and one for the charger.
As far as owning a reciprocating saw for construction, I would not have anything but my Milwaukee. It is just not a good tool in the garden. :-)
____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My first "sawzall" is the PC Tigersaw with the switchable orbital action. I still have it, it still works and does a good job. It was purchased new. My second "sawzall" is a rebuilt Milwaukee Super Sawzall with the counterweight. Both saws have the keyless blade chucks and have had few problems. Sometimes pliers are needed to loosen the chuck if it gets too tight. I would say that a reciprocating saw is an excellent tool for the garden even on a ladder; safer than an equivalent chain saw. The tool weight is less of an issue when the blade can rest on the limb to be cut. It will get heavy in use overhead or when holding onto the saw while pulling cut limbs out of the way. One benefit to the recip saw is that if a blade gets pinched into a cut, you can disconnect from that blade, put in another blade and cut the first one free from another angle. Most chain saws do not come with a spare bar. The other tools mentioned may be better at outdoor tasks but have little use inside or with lumber containing nails.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harbor Freight has them about twenty bucks, now and again. If you only need it once.
Sears used to have electric chain saws about sixty bucks.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have used Sawzalls since I was a teenager in my family's Plumbing & heating business. They do the job and last forever. There may be other good brands, but why take a chance.
Stretch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Eric" wrote

I'm on my 2nd Milwaukee sawzall in 14 years, and would buy another. They've seen some heavy usage.
Can't compare a Hitachi sawzall, but do have a Hitachi sheathing stapler, brad nailer, and a finish nailer. I really like these guns. Had a Senco finish nailer and a brad nailer, and the Hitachi is more balanced IMO. I may buy a Hitachi sawzall next time around, unless I see some negative remarks about them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
To clarify - you are looking for a recipricating saw. "Sawzall" is a trademark of Milwaukee. Sort of like Kleenex, a lot of people call recipricating saws a Sawzall.
The choice of the pros, and genrally considered the best, is the Milwaukee.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I believe Hitachi is getting out of the power tool market. Check out their web site. As for Milwaukee, they are great. When I purchased mine, they had a lifetime warranty. I see they have changed it to 5 years. 5 years is still fantastic for a power tool and I can attest that my Super Sawzall is running great after 9 years now. I have cut the occasion limb with it, but they do feel a little awkward doing it. Milwaukee does sell pruning blades for them though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
borgunit Wrote:

I've been a plumbing contractor for almost 30 years, and I've neve ever been treated so badly by anyone as by Milwaukee when I took sawzall in for repairs. Without going into details, that one inciden will forever keep me from buying anything that says Milwaukee on it. don't know what caused this, I wasn't rude or pushy, just wanted to ge a sawzall repaired. I wrote to the company headquarters about it, an got a less-than-worthless reply.
I have had very good luck with Hitachi tools and am sorry to hear tha they may be leaving the business
-- 5p5
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
5p5 wrote:

I am using Porter & Cable saw. So far so good. I think De Walt(B&D) is not so good lately? Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Makita makes a piss poor excuse for both a sawz all, and a worm drive saw. Stay far far away from those 2 tools altho most of the other makita tools are good
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rnr_construction wrote:

I noticed most Makita is made in China. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Porter cable is a fair prod for the money. Milwaukee has a bad habit of not standing behind prods and just ripping people off.
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 00:28:45 -0400, "ConcreteFinishing&StuccoGuy"

Guess I have to scratch my head...on your Milwaukee comment...???
I own quite a few Milkaukee products and never had any problems with the tools or with getting service when I needed it... I
Bob G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 00:28:45 -0400, "ConcreteFinishing&StuccoGuy"

I have a Milwaulkee Sawzall and Milwaulkee corded drill. Both excellent high-quality well-built products. Personally I did not feel ripped off. I bought these 10 years ago. But, sometimes companies can and do cheapen their products to increase profit. Probably I stay clear of Taiwanese, Korea or China-made power tools. Japan, USA, and Canada, Germany-made tools are generally better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I beat the hell out of Porter Cable recip. saw and it comes back for more. Real good saw for only a 100.00 at home depot.
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If it is a toss-up, why don't you buy from an American company?
Call me crazy, but this is always a consideration for me (and I drive a Nissan). Recent refrigerator purchase came down to an LG and an Amana manufactured in Iowa. LG was slightly cheaper but we went with the Amana for that very reason.
On Thu, 05 May 2005 14:50:05 -0400, Eric wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ain't many people out there like you.
I'll also buy an American product over an 'import' if the price is close.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks everyone for all the advice. I went ahead and picked up the Milwaukee. The Hitachi seemed fairly solid too but the Milwaukee was more comfortable to hold (Hitachi was rather bulbous where one holds it near the blade end) and the Milwaukee had the added bonus of being the consensus pick for best.
A chainsaw may be in my future as well but I decided the Sawzall was the most versitile tool (and I thought of 3-4 immediate uses beyond the initial pruning).
Again, thanks. Eric
Eric wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a Milwaukee sawzall and like it. But for what you're doing, I would probably use a bow saw. (The kind with a sort of curved L-shaped metal handle and the blade strung across, cost about $10.) Not as sexy but you can operate it with one hand, and you get some exercise too. It will go through the branches almost as fast. Even if you get the sawzall, you might want to get one of these too. Lets you just pick up and do small trim jobs without fetching an extension cord, etc.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.