Sawsall Blade types for Wall Removal

Trying to cut away large sections of walls to be removed, which are plastered with lath and plaster (not sheetrock). This involves cutting thru the exterior of the house siding, 1" boards under it, and some studs. I was using a chainsaw, which worked fine for the first couple feet, but then the teeth got real dull. I was careful to avoid nails, but it's hard to keep from hitting that plaster, since there are globs between the laths.
I just sharpened the chain again, but decided I'll have to sharpen this chain many times before I finish this job, and will probably have to buy a new chain by the time I'm finished. I think that my sawsall might be a better choice since the blades are cheaper and much easier to replace. My question is the type of blade to use. Do they make any blades intended for demolition? I will continue to do my best to avoid nails, but there is no guarantee, and I'll hit at least some plaster no matter what. Do they make carbide tipped blades for a sawsall? (I may try to use my circular saw with a carbide blade for the straight cuts too). At least with the circular saw the depth of cut can be controlled better to avoid the plaster. However, the circular saw cant do much for cutting out studs, which is where I must use the sawsall, and where it will hit plaster.
One other thing, there is pink fiberglass insulation in the walls. Does fiberglass dull blades? While it's easy to cut, I wonder if fiberglass acts as an abrasive to dull them, since it is a glass product??????
Thanks
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On Apr 19, 3:54am, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

remove the inner lathe and plaster wall and insulation FIRST. which allows inspection for hidden hazards like wires, plumbing etc etc.......
put some chip board over the inner wall temporarily if necessary
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Yes, they do make demolition blades. Available at Home Depot.
If you have a team (two guys changing blades on saws, and one on the saw that's being used) you can use blades from Harbor Freight. But, they don't last very long.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Good ideas, but this is a demolition job of the old part of the house. The newer part was already cut away and walled off. No plumbing in there since it was removed first. If I cut wires that dont matter, the power is off and all the wire is being very old K&T or cloth covered romex which will be sold for scrap. While removal of plaster would help, because of fallen parts of the roof and other things that collapsed, it's too dangerous to go inside. The walls are being cut into sections from the outside and dragged with machinery to a burn pile.
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snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

This is different than originally thought. Either rent a Bobcat or backhoe and have at it.
--
Tekkie

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snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

I am surprised they allow you to burn this stuff.
-- Tekkie
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On 4/19/2012 2:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

the milwalkee "AX" blades hold up to plaster fairly well. and will go through nails.
--
Steve Barker
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On 4/19/2012 8:25 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

I was on a remodel job where I had to cut through a lot of old plaster and lath walls. The only saw blades and hole saws that would hold up were the carbide tooth variety.
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

And likely a new sprocket-- maybe a new bar. And make sure that air filter stays on tight as that old plaster dust would score up your cylinders in short order.

and it is quieter-- and a lot easier to handle. a chainsaw might be handy for the odd beam in demolition, but it is the *wrong tool* for what you're doing.

I like 'the axe' for general stuff. But for what you're doing, get a demolition blade set - $25 for 12 blades. (Amazon.com product link shortened) />/
Get 2 for what a chain alone would cost you and don't even think about it when you toss a blade that is dull.
Jim
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wrote:

I agree about the chainsaw needing a new bar and all of that. I should mention this is an electric chain saw. Too much hassle restarting a gas one every few minutes. These electric chainsaws are great for building things like barns, where 6x6 poles need to be cut and stuff like that. A circular saw cant cut deep enough, and gas chainsaws are too heavy when you're up on a ladder 20 feet in the air against a pole. Not to mention having to fart around pulling the cord to start them, when up there. I use my electric chainsaw much more than my gas one. The gas one is only for large tree trucks, or places where there is no electricity.
Thanks for the blade web-link.
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On 4/20/2012 12:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

i'm curious as to why you would need to restart the saw every few minutes. I've run mine 8 to 10 hours a day and only restarted it after it ran out of fuel.
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Steve Barker
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-snip-

-snip-
Just guessing, here, but I'll bet you aren't running a gas saw *inside* for 8-10 hours straight.<g>
Jim
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On 4/22/2012 5:29 PM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

and neither was he. he said it was unsafe to go inside. I have, however, run the gas powered leaf blower inside, but not for hours.
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Steve Barker
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:54:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

Get a "demolition blade". I think there is a good one called a "gator". They'll cut lath, spikes, and anything that gets in the way. Don't use it on a cheap 6 amp saw though - the blade will outlast the saw.
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