Saw For Cutting Big Panels

Anyone who has carried big heavy sheet of plywood around, or tried to cut a straight line on one has probably cast an envious eye at the track-mounted panel saws that lumber yards use to slice up big sheets. With this easy to make jig, you can turn your portable circular saw into a panel saw that will do the same job in your own home. It's a simple A-frame stand that leans against the wall and holds any style portable saw. Slide the saw down and it slices a panel in a single stroke. Turn the saw sideways and you can rip panels to their full length by feeding them into the saw lengthwise.
...for more info visit our website at: http://www.alternative-technologies.org/tools.html
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What technology does it involve that a 2x4 x8' doesn't incorporate ? (ie: a straight edge)
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Two cheap clamps and a 2x4 will do the trick.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I use 1 8' and 1 4' piece of 1/8" x 1 1/4" flat iron and two small C clamps. That allows operation of the saw either way as it will slide under the motor unless you are making a really deep cut.
Harry k
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On 31 Oct 2003 15:12:55 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@alternative-technologies.org (A.T.) wrote:

Not me!
I simply place the sheet flat on the floor, on blue foam insulation. I then clamp a straight board to it, and set the blade for 1/8" thicker than the wood. I can kneel right on the panel and cut quickly, accurately and safely.
The foam board is light, cheap, and weatherproof, so it's easy to store, inside or out..
Panel cutters are nice, but they take up an inordinate amount of space unless the user cuts a lot of sheets. I'm simply cutting them to a manageable size, for final trimming on a table saw.
Barry
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On Sat, 01 Nov 2003 12:53:08 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .
editing):
...snip

They take up an inordinate amount of space even if the user cuts a lot of sheets!
My solution is to hinge it to the ceiling joists and haul it up out of the way when you're not using it.
Btw, you can build your own for a fraction of the cost of commercial units.
--
Larry
Email to rapp at lmr dot com
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The original message appears to have been posted by someone selling plans, so not only is it not practical for most people here ( L.M. seems to have both a use and a solution to the storage problem unlike most of us) but the original message does not belong here. (I don't believe L. M. was the originator of the thread)
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Several years ago I bought the Penn State Industries, PSI, panel cutting jig and find it works quite well for me. Pull 4X8 slabs out of the PU on sawhorses, clamp the guide and cut the ply. THEN I can work them on the tablesaw. I gave up knee work several years ago and this jig obviates asking the knees to do something. About $100.00 USD.
wrote:

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