Saving grass seed for next spring?

Is it possible to save an opened bag of grass seed for next spring? If so, how would you store it over the winter?
Thanks
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so,
Sure, but be aware the coverage rates will go down. When I planted grass as a kid, there was even a decay rate chart on the bag. As long as it is stored dry, some of the seed will remain viable for years. I'd decant it into a bucket with a tight-fitting lid to reduce chances it will draw moisture or bugs. If you don't have space for a bucket, some of the giant-size ziploc bags will also work. I'd keep it inside if possible, just to keep it dry.
aem sends...
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Sure. There's a date on the bag. Probably it's a good idea to use the seed within 18 months. Keep the seed dry and cool and up off the floor where it may attract varmints.
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spring? If so,

I just used some dated 2000. It sprouted fine. Stored in the garage with a clothespin holding the bag folded closed.
Bob
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ive been using some out of the same bag for about 4-5 years to fill patches... no problem. i just keep in closed in the shed.
randy

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I keep mine in a spare refrigerator. In the very early spring, a few weeks before seeding time, put a small sample on a moist paper towel, fold up the paper towel and put it in a sealed plastic bag, like a sandwich bag, then check it two or three weeks later to get an idea of how many of the seeds germinated. If it is a good number, use the seed; if few germinated, get new seed.
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William Brown wrote:

You can also use the time honored method of just sprinkling the seeds on the surface of some water in a cup or glass. It'll float, and if it does germinate, you'll see it happening.
Jeff
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As long as you keep the seed dry and where the mice cannot get at it, it should be fine. I grew snap peas this year from seeds I bought years ago. Seeds were found in the pyramids of Egypt that could still germinate.
The suggestion of another reply to keep them moist or in water was silly. As long as they remain dry, they should be able to sprout when they are planted and remain moist.
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snipped-for-privacy@xnet.com (David Efflandt) wrote in message wrote:

In general, if done correctly, grass can be stored for a couple of years and still have good germination rates. Store it where it is cool and dry. I store it in the basement inside a garbage can. I put one of the chemical dampness remover jars that you can find at Walmart or boat supply stores inside to lower the humidity.
One other issue is if the grass is endophyte enhanced. If it is, the endophyte, which is a fungus, only lasts several months. The grass will still grow, but the endophyte protection will be lost.
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