sanding glass

I finally got the dining room table I have wanted for years and I hate it. It has a 6' round glass top and it is always smudged. To make matters worse, the chairs are on casters so we end up grabbing the edges of the table to pull ourselves to the table so it is also smudged under the table to. I keep a table cloth on it all the time now and it is hard to say which is more trouble keeping clean.
So, I was wondering if a textured glass top would be a bit better and could I do that myself with an orbital sander? I thought that if I sanded the backside of the glass, it would hide smudges better. If so, what grit sand paper and everything? I saw one of the home improvement shows do it, but my neighbor thought they used Plexiglas, not glass.\
Thanks
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wrote:

If that's what you really want, take it to a sand-blasting shop.
...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, P.E. | mens |
| Analog Innovations, Inc. | et |
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it.
table
which
could
backside
and
neighbor
Agreed, you will find that sand papers on an orbital or belt sander will only serve to remove material. Sand blasting or glass beading is the way to achieve an opaque look.
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wrote:

Actually, very fine wet/dry paper with lots of water (use an air driven sander) will sand evenly. However, you'll see whatever pattern your sander creates. IOW, an orbital sander will give you little round rings, etc. You can't really get what you want without sandblasting.
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Time to bit the bullet.
You don't like a glass table. ( neither would I )
Replace it !
No matter what you do to it ( sanding, decals, etc. ) it'll still be a glass table, prone to smudges, shattering, etc.
Replace it, and get something you'll like.
When we first got married, we got a big old pine trestle table. Over the years, it's been used for meals, repairs, homework, and crafts projects. It's been dinged, singed, dented, and shows the wear of a thousand uses. It's been re-sanded, re-stained, re-varnished numerous times.... it has our family history. It's a "work table", and we wouldn't have it any other way.
<rj>
wrote:

<rj>
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There are glass etching products at craft stores that might do the trick and work a lot better than an orbital sander.
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That's a big surface to treat and get it even, with a sander or with etching solution. There are glass companies in this area that advertise in the Yellow Pages that they do custom etching and/or sandblasting. Maybe you can check on this possibility in your area.

it.
table
which
could
backside
and
neighbor
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