Salt as Root Control in Toilet?

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On Sat, 24 Mar 2012 21:03:10 -0700, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

...but you repeat yourself, incessantly.
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thank you. I do so enjoy your attempts at humor, now roll over and beg for more attention
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I didn't know you were a fan.
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The traditional "root remedy" is copper sulfate crystals since copper kills the parts of plants that it touches. I used it a few times, but found that the roots just came back when I wasn't paying attention such as during the winter when the ground was frozen. The best solution: plastic sewer pipes with no joints anywhere near a tree.
Tomsic
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That's correct, but I think copper sulfate is not only traditional, it's also considered an environmental hazard and isn't sold anymore for that purpose.
I find the salt option kind of peculiar. You'd have to dump a big shovelful of salt into the toilet to get a mix that, when diluted, might discourage tree roots. But even if you did, other water use in your house that would dilute it would also pretty quickly flush it out. I guess if you put in a lot, and moved out for a few days to let the salty water take effect, it might work.
I think bezonitrile is what they use these days. Isn't that basically what RootX is? The stuff is a potent herbicide, and it's pretty toxic to fish and wildlife, but the version they use is biodegradable, and it gets foamy and sticky in the pipes to cling to the roots.
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On Mar 21, 9:28am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I'd be more concerned about the cast iron drain pipes myself...
That said, I've heard this recommentation before, but not exactly phrased that way, what I've heard recommended is to put a bunch of rock salt in your laundry sink and dissolve that and let it drain, 1-2x a year. His way sounds like a good way to turn it into a constant release kind of thing, but I would share the concern about possible damage to metal components (I grew up in western PA and have seen the same things happen to vehicles... my dad had a '67 Olds that he bought new and it was retired something like 12 years later when the frame rusted completely through. At that time it was by far the oldest vehicle in the neighborhood, save for the next door neighbor's Cougar which hadn't actually been driven since I was old enough to notice.)
nate
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If your sewer pipes are letting roots in, they are broken.
Better to get the leaky pipes repaired.
--
Dan Espen

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That is the solution, but it is pricey. Not more pricey than a few years of rotorooting though. DAMHIKT. Make sure the street sewer isn't blocked. Mine was (dates from 1929), and that contributed to flooding experienced by neighbors. In other words, when they replace your "lateral" sewer line (house to street), ask the contractor to look down the main sewer and have him notify the town if he finds obstructions. Use the contractor who does most of the work for the town.
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Actually, the roots can worm their way into unbroken pipes and then grow and break them. Either way, a repair is in order.
nb
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As one who has tried the rock salt method for controlling roots, I can say with a bit of certainty that it doesn't work in cases where the roots are entering the top of the pipe.
Since the salt water running along the bottom of the pipe never contacts the hanging roots, the roots are left to hang free, snagging bits ot toilet paper and waste.
You'll start with a partial blockage (slow drains and gurgling drains/ toilets in the lower part of the house) and eventually enough stuff will get hung up to cause a full stoppage.
My next step is to try Root-X, which is a foaming product that supposedly coats the entire pipe and kills the roots.
I already have the product, I just have to wait until some roots grow back since the last cutting because the product likes growing ends to help it kill the roots.
See here:
http://www.rootx.com /
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There is a recent thread on this very topic..... do a search.
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