Safe to paint picky people's homes with air sprayer?

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I have an airless sprayer and use it to paint homes. A custom home builder asked if I want to paint the house he is building but was surprised I paint with an airless sprayer. He thought painting is always done with rollers.
Will the airless not paint as good as rollers do? These custom homes are purchased by picky rich people from what I heard, so will the paint job not be of a high quality when I am done? Are there things I can do to improve the quality while using an airless?
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Airless sprayers are great, and I am a big fan of them. BUT, they leave a lot of overspray. EVERYTHING has to be covered up or removed entirely. If they are that picky, they won't like dried paint droplets on their "stuff". For this type of job, I would go with brush and roller.
One can backroll behind a person spraying with an airless. I do it with a big nappy sheepskin roller. This evens it out and gives it a good stipple. It is a two man operation. But again, you will get paint everywhere that isn't entirely covered. Takes more time to mask and cover than to just brush and roll carefully. Just MHO.
Steve
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Depends what you're doing with it. Definitely spray and backroll when you prime the drywall; you can do the whole house in a day. Spray the trim package with oil if it's painted...you'll get a factory-like finish if your prep was good. Make sure your prep is impeccable as a spray finish will make any imperfections stand out, esp. extra and/or crappy looking caulk and nail holes that aren't filled properly. Keep in mind that the amount of masking is incredible when spraying anything. SW sells flake resistant plastic that you should use when spraying. Nothing ruins a good spray job like paint flakes from your plastic. Spraying trim is standard protocol on all the high end custom homes around here. Cut and roll the walls when its time to paint them. When you mask your trim, leave the caulk showing. That way your lines will be straight and you will have the solid wood to tape to, as taping to caulk will result in much more paint getting under your tape and horrible lines...which leads to a very aggravating cleaning and touching up process. The neat thing with oil paint being used for the trim is that you can very easily remove latex paint with denatured alcohol. On the plus side, for all your attention to detail, you can charge $2.50-$3 more per sq. ft. than on some 1500 sq. ft. ranch. If your builder has never seen sprayed trim, he needs to start looking around a bit more at what other people are doing. High-end builders around here insist on it.
Mike

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if you are concerned at all about 'picky rich people' i would simply pass on the job. no matter what you do they may not be satisfied....
randy
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I should add that Randy is correct in a way. Here's some Solid Advice Meant In The Best Possible Way That Could Keep You From Eating Many Thousands Of Dollars: If you don't have the experience to already have a game plan before starting a high end custom home then you shouldn't try painting one on your own. Guaranteed, you'll underbid, take too long, and end up frustrated if you don't have the background and crew. You won't pull it off with the 2nd cousin you haven't seen in 10 years and the two guys he met in the drunk tank over the weekend. Around here, reputation is everything. The painting market is oversaturated. Builders don't give second chances to new companies very often. There is a world of differenct between a house belonging to a "picky rich person" and a 1300 Sq.Ft. repaint. My advice to you is to explain your experience very clearly to this builder (who sounds like he could use a good "explaining to" with regard to painting) and do a couple easy things for him first. Never let a good builder go if you think you can meet his demands. Work your way to the top, don't try jumping there. At the very least, hire a foreman who has run a crew on high end new construction jobs. Get advice from as many local sources as possible before bidding. This can be as true for exteriors as well as interiors.
Mike <-----doesn't want to offend, just to warn

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Oh, those "picky rich people". I wonder if it's really those newly "I've got more money now" people who think the world should kneel at their feet.
Just like when I go to the carwash. It's so funny. The owners of BMW 7 series, Mercedes S series, and other $65,000+ cars just get their cars and go. The owners of "mid-luxury" cars do a walkaround and start pointing out every nit and nat they can find and demand that the carhop quickly redo their cars. Go figure--must seem like they have a sense of entitlement, doesn't it?
Ricky

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Those other people are leasing and will be in a new car in a year or two. Some of us actually plan on keeping our cars. *REALLY* picky people wash their cars themselves.
Dimitri
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I'm REALLY picking & I never wash my car or have it washed; except when it rains. :)
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 05:37:09 +0000 (UTC), someone wrote:

acquaintance had the valet parking concession at a REALLY high end event every year. The really rich folks, even those with classic cars that were not likely leased, didn't have a qualm about having their cars parked.
OTOH the few hoi polloi driving old bombs were the most irate, snotty and suspicious, and didn't want anyone else touching their cars. I've seen it myself - my teen stepson refused to go to events at a certain club (not ours, a relative's) with his crappy Hyundai, when he heard that there was valet parking there. I do not lease cars, yet I have been to events there several times.
Well, this is getting OT.
-v.
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How did this get from car washing to valet parking? The point I was trying to make is that supremely wealthy people don't *have* to care. A coworker's friend drives a $300K Bentley and some uninsured idiot hit him causing $10K in damage. He didn't even attempt to litigate. ("Can't squeeze blood from a turnip.") He just paid to fix the car. $10K is no big deal to *him*. It's not that the wealthy people trust valets more or trust car washes more. It's that they can handle whatever problems may result, including (if it comes to it) litigation. You can bet your bottom dollar that the guy who has to save for a few years to even *finance* the Corvette he intends to drive for the next 15 years is going to be much more irate when a valet/car wash scratches the hell out of it in his first year of ownership.
There are lots of reasons people in expensive cars don't care as much in addition to being wealthy enough to afford problems:
1. They want to be seen getting out of the car. Likewise, people in beaters often *do not* want to be seen getting out of the car.
2. They don't want to look cheap by driving a $300K car and avoiding a valet fee.
3. They want someone to watch over the car rather than park it on the street. People in beaters don't really care if the car is on the street.
4. They can afford it. Yes, sometimes poor people freak out when they have to pay $20 + tip to park. That doesn't make them bad people.
5. Convenience. Walking through downtown in a fur coat and dripping in diamonds isn't their idea of fun. The guy in khakis and loafers with a plastic watch doesn't care as much.
There are probably more reasons.
Dimitri
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I had a classmate in prep school whose German-born dad painted rich folks homes - and got premium bucks for being meticulous - even got written up in the NY Times for it. For most of my life, my godfather (who spent half his ten navy years painting - that's what navy folks do when bored) did a spotless job painting our house. Now he's old and since he wouldn't let me learn, I make a mess. What I do recall tho, is he used to drain the brush excessively. Of course, I use a sponge spreader and finish ten times faster than he did.
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I realize that I am jumping into this discussion a couple months late, but it seems that there are some here who are knowledgable regarding airless sprayers.
I recently bought the house next door for rental income. It has two units that both need painting. I also hope to purchase more property in the next couple of years. The tenents will not be super picky rich people, nor will they be very low end. Pretty smack dab middle, about $600 a month for a two bedroom. Here in Albany, there a lot of up and coming young professionals, who come and go with the current administration or sooner. I expext that average turnover would be arournd two years.
So, is it practicle for me to buy a sprayer, and how much do I need to spend. I've seen them from $20 to close to a thousand. I've got no problem spending the lower end, but would hesitate before spending much more.
Does it take a lot of practice? And if I am only going to do two units once every couple of years is it worth it? Any suggestions on brands or models, etc?
Regarding valet parking, I'd never let anyone park my car because I'd be too embaressed at the smell of the spoiled milk soaked car seat and my fast food wrappers on the floor. Plus I'm way too cheap to pay for it.
Gwen
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On 9 Dec 2004 10:38:19 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

I saw a house that was spray painted supposedly by a professional painter, but it was obviously a very poor job that can be seen from the street. On closer inspection, there was overspray on things that should not be painted. My personal preference is with a quality brush ($30) and paint roller.
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On 12/9/2004 10:21 PM US(ET), Phisherman took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

house and offer cheap painting and driveway coatings. They use cheap materials (motor oil on driveway) and are in and out in an hour. There qouted price is often jacked up at the end of the jog. They usually target the elderly and are certainly not 'professionals'.
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On the other hand, my house was spray-painted by a pro with the Ben Moore exterior paint I chose. He and his team prepped the heck out of the job (scraped a LOT), and it's still great after eight years. Four + days' prep, one day's actual paint.
So, it sounds like the problem was with the prep, not the paint.
Banty
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Spraying can be done right, Ive done evough of it. But little things like wind can make it unsafe, ex. cars parked even 100 ft away. Done right by a pro it will be fine.
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i'm primarily thinking of painting inside the units. Anyone have any experience with particular brands of sprayers. I'm thinking about the ... uh... what was it. I think its the wagner paintcrew, or something like that for about $200. It got good reviews on Amazon.com. Gwen
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It depends on how much use it will get, a 200$ sprayer may need repairs at 50 gallons. A 900$ Titan should go 300 gallons. The old storey , you get what you pay for. Cheap is Cheap.
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Re: Safe to paint picky people's homes with air sprayer? Group: alt.home.repair Date: Fri, Dec 10, 2004, 3:18pm From: snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mRansley) It depends on how much use it will get, a 200$ sprayer may need repairs at 50 gallons. A 900$ Titan should go 300 gallons. The old storey , you get what you pay for. Cheap is Cheap. ================================ I guess I'm lucky, my graco 395 sprayer has gone over a thousand gallons without any repairs, of course it was almost a thousand dollars without gun and hose. also I find an airless to be less of a mess than rolling, but I guess it could be the operater, 20 years behind a gun does that, of course I always brush and roll oil primer on all raw or rough wood
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On 10 Dec 2004 13:12:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Go with a power roller instead. This doesn't eliminate the need for quality canvas drop cloths.
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