Safe distance between wire and hot pipes

Is there some code requirements for spacing a wire and the hot pipe?
I did a 12 gauge wiring in the bathroom. After finishing, I found that I had the wire and CPVC hot water line too close - at some places they are as close as only 1" apart. I just don't want to rewire the whole thing, if it is not necessary.
Thanks for any info.
A.
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ABC wrote:

If they are not touching, it should be fine. (if they are touching, it still *might* be fine) How about wrapping the hot water pipes with that pipe-wrap insulation?
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

Insulating hot water pipes is always a good thing for energy savings.
But wiring in general (ROMEX notably) certainly can take boiling water and more. If you're running water at boiling, then you'll have other problems than power :).
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Chuck Yerkes wrote:

I figured wrapping the pipes would make him feel better, and was a good idea anyway for saving energy. I'm not sure what romex is rated for, but it's probably at least 75 C. It can surely handle more than that, but at some point you'd have to derate it.
Bob
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When the electrician wired my water heater, he taped the incoming Romex to the hot water pipe. I think the Romex is probably rated for 100 degrees C, although I can't say for sure. I'm assuming a licensed electrician knows the code and knew what he was doing. I questioned it and he said it would be ok and it appears to be ok. However, it's out in the open where it can easily be changed. Might be different buried in a wall.
Bob

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there's a very simple test. dunk some into boiling water. if it melts, its below 100C. if it doesnt, its higher.
randy

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its
Not really. The safe use temperature rating let's the user know that it won't degrade over time when used below that temperature at the rated current. One must consider that the rise in temperature due to current is additive to ambient. With a high ambient temperature, one would have to consider the derating curve. The melting point is well above the safe use point. Above that is the temperature at which it will support combustion.
Bob
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The insulation in Romex (NM-b) is 90c rated. That is the ambient air plus resistive heating. I doubt there is going to be that much heat transfer in free air but if these are bundled in an enclosed space it *might* be an issue.
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in theory... in reality, if the wire and cover doesnt melt it will work.
randy
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The standard non-metallic sheathed cable sold in Canada is rated at 90C, by code, to withstand possible temperatures within enclosed light fixtures. "90" is printed on it as part of its markings. I would expect it to be pretty much the same stuff sold in the U.S., so eyeball it and if you see the "90", then that's what you've got. 90C is over 190F.
Having said that, the pipe wrap sounds like a good idea to me.
Chip C

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Your light bulbs will be hotter when you touch them........ You will get a shock everytime you touch the hot water too..... I'd recommend you have the house demolished and start over, doing it right next time.
Some of life's lessons are hard to take....
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Canadian Electrical Code simply says that electrical wire should not be in contact with hot water pipes. A wad of fiberglass insulation is considered adequate seperation.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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