Ryobi 18v One+ Batteries

I have 4 of the above that don't hold a charge for more than an hour. I was at HD yeaterday buying some other stuff and saw a 2 pack of the above Ni-Cad batteries for $59.97 + tax. This is cheaper than the battery rebuilding companies.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Once in a while I'll buy a cheap no-name 18 volt drill with a single battery pack for $20 and take the battery apart and cut out individual cells and use them to replace the cells that have gone bad on the battery packs of other drills and other cordless items.
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On 06/07/13 10:25 am, Home Guy wrote:

How did you connect the replacements? Typically they are spot-welded; did you spot-weld them or simply solder them?
Perce
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I rebuilt an old Milwaukee cordless that used nicads. I found the nicads on Ebay, they were higher capacity than the old ones and they come with tabs spot welded to the ends. You have to then solder tab to tab, or possibly use a piece of wire for the last ones, etc. You also have to keep everything tight and aligned, there isn't much if any excess room.
It took me a couple of hours. Total cost was about $15 If you have an old pack that is shot, you can always try taking it apart and see how it goes. Not much to lose.
I also rebuilt a Philips cordless toothbrush the same way.
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On Fri, 07 Jun 2013 08:52:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Every time I've tried to solder nicad batteries, my success rate was about 10%. Something (heat) kills them fast unless you're really good at soldering (and I'm not).
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Did you get the batteries with the tabs on them? The tabs are about an inch long. Hard to imagine how you could get that much heat to the battery itself by using a solder iron.
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wrote:

Don't forget who's doing the soldering........
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Danny D wrote:

You could always use conductive epoxy, I've got some in the kitchen fridge freezer which has stayed usable for over 10 years now. It's worked great for me many times, including repairing a broken interconnection on a solar cell panel and reconnecting a broken off piece of aluminum magnet wire. (They used to make TV set deflection coils from aluminum wire back in the day when copper got scarce.)
Conductive epoxy's not cheap, but it's better than frustrating yourself trying to solder the unsolderable.
Nor is it easy to find, You-do-it sells it:
http://www.youdoitelectronics.com/MG/id971.htm
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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On 6/18/2013 1:58 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote:

epoxy might have too much resistance. Get batteries with tabs already welded on.
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mike wrote:

I agree that if he doesn't have the batteries already he should buy tabbed batteries and solder to the tabs.
But, using conductive epoxy would probably work. This stuff:
http://tinyurl.com/l6fbabm
has 0.0006 Ω·cm resistance, which if I understand the definition correctly means that if the area of the "patch" of epoxy securing a strip of metal to the battery is 1/2 cm by 1/2 cm (1/4 square cm) and the thickness of that patch of epoxy was as much as half a millimeter then the resistance of that patch would only be 0.0000075 ohm, which would hardly cause a noticeable voltage drop even at 50 amps of current. (Only about 3/8 of a millivolt, eh?)
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong about that.
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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On 6/7/2013 8:34 AM, willshak wrote:

I recall early on in Ryobi's 18v One+ (don't think they even used One+ then) They had them on sale for ~ $34 a pair. Even better deal was when they were selling off some of the accessory tools (vacuum?) that came with one battery and a charger and was on sale for like $20
At any rate, even at $59.97 all you're doing is buying new CRAP to replace the OLD crap they sold you. I've never seen batteries fold so fast. Properly charged and stored and they still don't last worth a damn.
IF you buy the new charger, a better deal would be to buy the One+ cells in the LiIon version. Nid is for fools with lots of money<g>
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On 06/07/13 09:34 am, willshak wrote:

I have three of the Ryobi NiCd 18V battery packs that will barely turn the drill even when they are claimed to be fully charged. I also have one of the small Li-Ion packs that is useless: I took it apart and found that two of the five individual 3.6V cells are dead. The local Batteries Plus store said that they do not rebuild Li-Ion packs. BTW, the cells in this pack are by Sanyo and are the same ones used in many other power-tool manufacturers' battery packs (including the ones with lifetime warranties and the *claimed* 19.2V ones by Sears; maybe they do show 19.2V for a minute or so immediately after being charged, but 5 x 3.6 = 18, not 19.2); the price per cell of the Ryobi ones is only about half that of some of the other brands.
I have two of the 2.4AH Li-Ion Ryobi packs that are still OK, but within a month or so of my purchase of the second one, they came out with 4AH ones at about the same price.
At present HD is offering the combination package of drill, impact driver, two "compact" Li-Ion battery packs, a charger and a carrying case for $99. Those battery packs are still advertised @ $39.97 each, but the improved higher-capacity (but still "compact") Lithium-Ion+ ones are $54.97 each or $99 for a two-pack. You could say that with the $99 combo deal you are getting the tools and the charger almost free.
Perce
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Yes, noticably less than Primecell (dot com). Question is quality. How long will they continue to work? I really don't know. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I have 4 of the above that don't hold a charge for more than an hour. I was at HD yeaterday buying some other stuff and saw a 2 pack of the above Ni-Cad batteries for $59.97 + tax. This is cheaper than the battery rebuilding companies.
Bill In Hamptonburgh, NY In the original Orange County. Est. 1683 To email, remove the double zeros after @
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On Friday, June 7, 2013 12:26:37 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The problem I keep having is the thermosister in my sears craftsman 19.2v nicads gets burned out. And it's an odd value that I have not been able to find.
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I've found odd things on Ebay and Amazon. Thermobrothers, and thermosisters and such. Sears can be trusted to use off spec parts. Might be a value close to original will work. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
The problem I keep having is the thermosister in my sears craftsman 19.2v nicads gets burned out. And it's an odd value that I have not been able to find.
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