Rusted Hot Water Base Board Cover


The cover in our bathroom over the hot water base board has rust speckles. The original paint job is factory bonded. Is there a way to repaint this and remove the rust speckles without stripping down the whole thing?
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If you can remove the rusted part, you could just rub it down with phosphoric acid and steel wool and then wet-sand with 400 grit and repaint.
The acid may or may not take off the factory finish, depending on what it is.
If you really want it to look like new, you could have it powdercoated, although a new heater is probably cheaper.
nate
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2007 15:43:53 -0500, N8N wrote Since I am the only male in the family and a surgeon I will try better aiming procedures in the future.

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The first thing you have to do is stop pissing on it. You can buy replacement covers at HD and then add a few coats of polyurethane.
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Sand it down, primer, then finish paint. If you don't get all the rust off, it will just come back in a short time. The only 100% positive way to eliminate it in the future is to sit when you pee and close the lid when you flush.
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Both Rust-oleum's rust conversion product (forgot the name) and Loc-tite's 'Rust Extender' convert the rust oxide from an oxidized surface to a more stable compound - kida like the difference between ionic and covalent bonds between atoms in their outer rings (appealing to your scientific mind, if I actually go that right). You are actually encourage to only remove the loose rust and *not* sand down to bare metal so taht there is enough material for the conversion. I have used the product and after the process is properly done there is little pitting of the surface where, otherwise, material would be missing. If pitting remains which you cannot live with just stop at an automotive body supply shop and ask for a tube of glazing compound (someone can help out if there is a more proper name). I've had teh sme tube for 15 years and it's still good. You just lay it on, allow to dry and sand off excess, filling the depression. Prime and paint. HTH, Chuck
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