Rust stain on tile


I got a new clothes washer yesterday (sweet!) and on taking the old one out, found one of the leveling legs had rusted and left a very noticeable stain on the tile. The tile is a matte finish, generally cleans up pretty well. I've tried a couple of so-called rust remover products (nothing specific to tile), which have helped, but there's still a distinct round, rusty circle on my off-white tile (don't get me started on keeping off-white tile clean in general in a utility room, don't know what the previous owners were thinking). The new washer has a different footprint from the old one, so the stain is right out there to be seen.
Any advice?
Jo Ann
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Jo Ann wrote:

oxalic acid. found in barkeeper's friend in the cleaning aisle of the grocery store.
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I use Oxy-Clean to remove rust stains from my porcelain sink. I make a very wet paste and let it sit for a few hours. Maybe yours is a similar problem.
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Have you tried the heavy duty Mr. Clean Magic Eraser on it? I swear those things remove just about anything.
Cheri
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I haven't tried the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser (and I've got one right in the pantry closet), Oxy-Clean, or Barkeeper's Friend yet! Thanks for all the good suggestions -- I'll report back :)
Jo Ann
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I've heard lots of good things about that Magic Eraser. Await your results.
I've had very good luck removing rust from porcelain and counter tops with Barkeeper's Friend. I had never noticed it contained oxalic acid. My exposure to oxalic acid was in products used to remove water stains from wood floors.
With the Barkeeps, I found making a paste, applying with a toothbrush, let it sit for 5min, brush, rinse and repeat to be a successful procedure.
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wrote:

If the above examples won't work, look into Sulfamic Acid - a stronger tile cleaner. Follow directions and even dilute it heavily at first.
RTM.
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Cheri wrote:

Save your money and use automotive paint "rubbing compound" for the heavy duty stuff and "polishing compound" for the lighter stuff. Probably about 1/100 the cost of the magic erasers. Oh, but you have to use your own rag or sponge.
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Jo Ann wrote:

Any acid will reduce the iron oxide to an easily removed salt. May take a while depending on acid and strength.
But the tile isn't likely to be actually stained, just have rust physically stuck to it. You should be able to remove it with a mild abrasive such as scouring powder.
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dadiOH
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Oh you mean like Bar Keepers Friend and/or Magic Eraser?
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Red Green wrote:

Yeah. Or Ajax, Bab-O, etc. which most people are likely to already have :)
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Jo Ann wrote:

Any acid will reduce the iron oxide to an easily removed salt. May take a while depending on acid and strength.
But the tile isn't likely to be actually stained, just have rust physically stuck to it. You should be able to remove it with a mild abrasive such as scouring powder.
--

dadiOH
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Not directly pertinent to your question, but if your laundry room is a basement or otherwise damp, I would get some anti-seize paste (available at any auto parts store) and remove each leveling foot, smear a little anti-sleaze on the threads, reinstall, relevel. I got a used washer from a friend that was in excellent condition save that it had been in the same place for years, when I went to level it for my laundry room, I had to heat up the feet with a torch to remove them, clean up on wire wheel, retap threaded holes, then finally reinstall before I could level it.
If you don't keep appliances for ~20 years this is likely not an issue for you, but I'm a cheap b*****d.
nate
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I just wish I could have kept my last washer for 20 years! It was an 8-year-old Kenmore (built by Frigidaire, I think). The problem that took it out of service? A FUSE. That was permanently attached to a circuit board. That was permanently attached to a motor. The low estimate I got on repairing it was $300, and I decided that was a pretty good down payment on a new machine. Talk about an idiotic design. From what I was told, this dawned on someone a couple years later and the newer ones were built with a replaceable fuse. I have a "Joe the appliance guy," but he couldn't figure out a way to rig it to work without the fuse. I suppose someone who knew more about electronics might have been able to repair the circuit board or something, but then appliances started going on sale at the end of the year, I was already fed up with dropping thirty bucks and two hours at the laundromat every week, and the rest is history :)
Shoulda kept the one I bought 20 years ago...it's probably still running.
Jo Ann
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I would probably have soldered fly leads to the circuit board and used an automotive fuseholder sticky backed to whatever enclosed the board. but that's just me.
nate
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Sure wish you'd been here ;)
Jo Ann
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Jo Ann wrote:

there's usually a good reason for a fuse to blow. chances are the board was fried elsewhere too.
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All I know for sure is that both guys who looked at it for me -- both of whom I trust pretty well -- said replacement of the whole unit was the only option. It gave good service while it worked, but I can't help thinking 8 years is not much of a track record. I looked on the net, and there are quite a few reports of similar problems.
Jo Ann
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Jo Ann wrote:

It's an easy repair but something made the fuse blow. Bad connection, power surge, a shorted component, etc. You have to determine what caused a fuse to blow to start with. I would solder in a fuse holder.
TDD
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