Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

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stored outside in the sun without damage from UV exposure. </quote> source: http://www.polymoldproducts.com/PE_PIPES.htm
Some poly pipe can take it and some apparently can not.
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Ah! Thank you for mentioning it. Given all the other posts where there has been no mention of black polypipe except for a very early post, but some other things I've never heard of and UV, I was beginning to wonder if black polypipe hadn't made it to US.
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On 7/1/2011 4:31 AM, FarmI wrote:

Back in the late 1950's and early 1960's, 2 inch black poly pipe is what my father used to get water from our spring's pump house to the water system at our home on the farm. We had to make sure the buried pipe was in a bed of sand because 200 yards of plastic pipe will move when pressurized. On more than one occasion a small stone would rub a hole into the pipe so we had to dig it up, patch the pipe with a plastic coupling then rebury it with sand around it. I remember the pipe as having a fairly thick wall and not being very flexible.
TDD
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 06:10:11 -0500, The Daring Dufas

I never heard of buried poly moving from being pressurized... perhaps your system was prone to air locks, which is easy to eliminate by installing a simple device that cushions the system. Anyone installing an irrigation system from their domestic water needs to install an anti backflow valve or they are looking for big trouble.
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On 7/1/2011 11:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Oh it had a check valve at the pump but the pipe went straight for a distance then down into a gully where the spring was located. No matter what material a pipe is made of, it's going to move when pressurized. Pipe will also move with a change in temperature. Look at how metal pipe is supported in different situations. The longer the pipe the more movement becomes a problem.
TDD
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That's interesting and different from our experience.
We use 2 inch poly runnin goff the pump on our dam and leading up to the tank on the hill to gravity feed for the toilets and the garden and it'd be about 200 yards in distance. It's not buried , must have been there about 20 years by now and we've never had any trouble from it. We dont' ever run that pump flat out though - just putttering alone at about half speeed (dont' ask me why because I don't know). The ants use teh poly as an ant superhighway, but I guess their tracks aren't doing anything much to wear it. The only trouble we've had with any 2 inch poly was buried and was in the gravity feed section. It started leaking and had to be dug up and fixed and then reburied, but I think it might have been a tree root that caused it to rupture.
I'm a huge fan of polypipe as I can repair most of it myself without ever having called upon Himself to do it.
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On 7/1/2011 9:07 PM, FarmI wrote:

My dad never knew I was responsible for leaks in some of the hose that was coiled up and not installed. It seems that a .22 bullet will travel a long way so you better know what's behind your targets. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Plenty black poly in the US, used for about every automatic sprinkler system... but in most all cases it's completely buried so UV is not a problem.
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On Jun 30, 4:50am, "Stormin Mormon"

I laid a "temporary line" some 200 ft with a 50' side branch with mostly 3/4" PVC (white) on top of the ground to water newly planted trees in 1977. Pulled it about 15 years later. Had a few leaks each spring but fittings are very cheap and patching is nothing but a hacksaw and tube of glue. Currently using pieces of that same pipe for another 'temporary' line to bypass a busted frost free hydrant (can't replace without digging through a mass of tree roots). That lien is also above ground and only needed one patch this spring (usually there are several). Line has been in place over 10 years.
Harry K
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On Jul 1, 6:31pm, "Stormin Mormon"

It for sure gets brittle but doesn't seem to bother as long as it isn't moved. Brittleness shows when it breaks due to frost, fractures propagate down the line for several feet at times. I would probably go with black poly if I didn't have the stock of PVC. I think poly stands freezing a bit better.
Harry K
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wrote:

For a large job such as described by the OP 20' lenghts will cause lots of leaking problems, and short lengths can't be laid by machine... Home Depot, Lowes, and any plumbing supply emporium sells tubing in spools of several hundred feet. You can buy 300' rolls of 1" PVC from Amazon with free shipping: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Would still be easier and less costly to haul water as needed.
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Poly is not PVC. Poly does not have problems from UV and doesn't need replacing every few years. I have poly that has been in use above ground for 20 years.

Everyone has recommended that the OP use poly not PVC. Poly is short for polyethylene.
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I ran 1" PVC about a 1/4 mile buried in 1976. Still in service today with no leaks. Same for all my sprinkler lines. Only leak I have had was one fitting where I made the misstake of using a female PVC/male Iron fitting. NEVER do that! Always use a malepvc/female iron. Much fun as it broke in the middle of winter and I had to shut off the the entire line until spring so I could dig it up.
Harry K
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On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 21:52:35 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Where do you live that you're irrigating in winter... and if you live in a warm clime where one irrigates all year WTF mention winter, and if it's warm enough to irrigate WTF would you need to wait until spring to dig... are you fibbing? From reading your posts you're just making it ALL up... "iron" irrigation fittings your ass.
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On Jul 2, 5:15am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

WTH? Where did I say I irrigate in winter? The system was my new well. the line that broke was an irrigation line used in summer. Where do I live? In Wa State.
Why don't you just give up? You have proven to be an utter moron,
Harry K
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I fully doubt that. Nothing seems to sink into that head of his. At first I thought he was just another no-nothing, now I am sure he could be certified as a moron by a psychiatrist.

Exactly what happened to my line. I laid it in the fall and the leak (massive) surfaced in January. Had to shut down my well and re-open the community well line that I gave up on by drilling my own well. I had wound up being the unpaid maintenance man on the community well. Had enough of that after 10 years.
Harry K
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Yep. I'm in mid winter now in the sthn hemisphere and since it's been the driest June for decades, I've currently got my low pressure sprinkers running on my asparagus bed.
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wrote:

Being so "cheap"inexpensive (as you say) I can't imagine anyone painting plastic tubing rather than occasionally replacing a portion... and it's not like it's going to deteriorate from UV within a short time... if not abused by kinking and driving vehicles over PVC it will last well over 10 years outdoors (no one paints their PVC drip systems either).
And no one would use glue for an irrigation system, every professionally installed system I've ever seen, and I've seen a lot of them and installed several myself, holds it all together with stainless steel crimp clamps, not screw type hose clamps, they use a stainless steel ring and crimping tool (fast, inexpensive, and neat - screw type hose clamps are expensive, difficult to work in dirt, and present a hazard due to the loose end). Gluing makes it difficult to make changes/repairs. http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Stainless-Steel-Crimp-Clamps-s/189.htm
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Use drip irrigation!
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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thanks for all the helpful posts....... I think that the 1 inch polypipe is the way to go !!
James
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