running water but only an outhouse?

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On Thursday, August 16, 2012 4:36:24 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

We're the opposite; well water and city sewer. They wanted to run a sewer line through our land so as part of the deal we got hooked up for free. The city water line stops at the development over the ridge.
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wrote:

Yes, very likely. Many places had pumps for water, then eventually city water, but no sewer. Some houses had septic tanks. In fact, I know of a few houses like that today.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 11:41:24 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Exactly. I just remember the odd fixtures in the kitchen. ;-)
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Running water requires a municipal water pipe to the property. Flush toilets require a municipal sewage pipe away from the property. These are separate pipes. Modern practice for "serviced" land builds both pipes at the same time, but these services were added in the 19th century to properties that had already been built, thus not necessarily at the same time.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Fri, 17 Aug 2012 11:37:37 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

- and in MANY locations city water was easily supplied, but sanitary sewers would be terribly expensive because the houses were several feet to hundreds of feet lower than the sewage treatment facility.
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The hand pump in the back yard was left operational and it was self-priming. The one in the kitchen may have been too.
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My GP had running water but had outhouses. Tub in kitchen for baths, hot water from coal stove. Grandfather would come home coal black.
Oddity around Pittsburgh in later years. Toilet in basement with no walls. The Pittsburgh toilet. I don't understand why they didn't have shower, but did have sink for clothes.
Greg
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wrote:

Perfect. An actual example.

In NYC, it was illegal, for decades I think, to take a bath. Because heaing the water was so much effort, and maybe the water and heat cost money, that more than one person would have to bath in the same water. So people were supposed to go to the public baths, which might have been showers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asser_Levy_Public_Baths built in 1904.
It seems public baths were legistlated in NY when many people in tenements had no place to bathe at all. I don't know where the galvanized tub that hang outsdie the kitchen window between buildings came in, before then or afterwards.
I guess the law was written so it excluded people with some money.

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On 8/16/12 11:42 AM, micky wrote:

It depends on the age of the house, I guess. My parents (Mom is 91) had windmills for livestock and hand pumps for the house. They had an outhouse. I think REA first brought electricity to that farm sometime around 1947 if I remember the stories correctly. The first farmhouse I grew up in had running water supplied by a private well. The only odd thing was lack of a toilet. The outhouse was maybe 50 yards away or so. There was also a separate wash house on that farm. That farm had artisan wells way back when. Livestock watering was easy. The artisan wells are history. Irrigation has dropped the water levels too far.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 20:27:45 -0500, Dean Hoffman

"ram pump" down in the springhouse about 200 feet or more from the barn. The "dairy cooler" was cooled by that spring water, The house, however, had a pump at the kitchen sink, and a pump on the cistern out back. The "backhouse" was in the orchard.
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I have a friend in the city of pittsburgh that has city water for many years, but is still on a septic tank, because of elevations, last i heard it would cost 85 grand for a new line, o lift pump for the sewer line
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micky wrote:

It's possible for a house to have running water and no kind of sewage ability.
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micky wrote:

The house I grew up in was built in 1880. It had running water in the kitchen long before a bathroom was added (which was before my time). It also still had (capped) gas jets in the walls for lighting.
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wrote:

That's the image I had for their house. Thanks.
For other readers, there were almost no apartment buildings in Indianapolis, and even poor people had houses or rented them.. There still aren't many apartments. The city wasn't built out that far in 1920, but when it was gettting near, the law prohibited apartment buildings north of 38th St. (and there weren't many south of that street either. ). I think maybe in the 1970's they allowed an aparatment building between 38th and 40th street. Of course this is the north side and my question was about the south side. There must have been some new housing on the south side but I don't remember any. I only had my own car for two summers while my mother lived there.
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micky wrote:

What's the name of the (relatively) nice apartment building near downtown? Name begins with "E" IIRC. It dates from the 20s? How about the Marott? 20s too?

As far as I'm concerned, Indianapolis stops at 38th Street :)
In 1949. when I was 16, myself and a buddy hitchhiked down from Marion. The ostensible purpose was to go to the state fair but, hey, as long as we were there, might as well go to the Fox (old burlesque house). Unfortunately, it was closed for the summer. Fortunately, the even older Mutual Follies wasn't :)
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wrote:

Nah, I don't remember therm.
Just in case, I'm not saying there were no apartments, but nothing like Chicago or NY or even Baltimore and I think DC where loads of people over much of the city lived in 6 apartment buildings or bigger.

LOL. That's where the fairgrounds are. And the TeePee, right next door. Although I think the TeePee is gone. Although2 it still gets a lot of hits, including the TeePee menu. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jimwallace/6921628671 /
http://www.rogerlandry.com/teepee.html It looks like the paraphrase menu above got incorporated into the second url too!, but it has a real menu also. When my brother wanted people to open a drive-in restaurant in Brooklyn, they thought he meant a restaurant with a parking lot.

Hehe. Some time in the 60's my older brother saw a stripper AT the State Fair. At least that's what I was told.
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wrote:

There are still houses that have outhouses in the country. A farm house I lived in the 1970s had a real outhouse, but the hole was filled in with dirt. I moved it and turned it into a chicken coop.
In the early 1900s, there may have been a hand pump inside the house. Later a windmill pump or electric one. But that dont mean they always installed a toilet. Some Amish people still build outhouses too. Actually I have a look-alike outhouse. It looks like one but its a shed for garden tools. I just put a moon on the door for fun. So, those that look like outhouses are not always real.
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On Aug 21, 11:18pm, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

The best outhouse I ever used didn't even have a house.
A friend spent a summer camping on his land while building a cabin. Throughout the summer, friends and family from all over the country came and went, spending a few days or a few weeks, camping and helping with the build.
The land overlooked a valley. My friend build an "outhouse", but didn't build any walls, except for short wall on the back that hid your private oarts from view. You sat on the throne and looked out over the valley. Users approached the "facility" from behind, so you would see the person's head from far off, know that it was being used, and wait your turn.
It was a beautiful view.
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On Wed, 22 Aug 2012 13:19:32 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

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Yep! ;-)
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