Running my house from a Generator, can I do this?....

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Yep, it may be junk. Just wondering if I can get it for $700 - $800, if I should give it a shot. I'm guessing the Named Brand 12000W Generators are in the $2K - $3K range.
m Ransley wrote:

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Is that 12000w surge or continous, or 6-7000w continous load, does it supply 120v 60hz at no load and full load, or does it sag so 90v 50hz? How good is the govenor and output. There is alot more to generators then a frame, motor and gen head. It may be a deal, or it may be a dump, you should find out first.
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So to be able to do that, it sounds like I would have to move breakers 2 & 4 to the bottom to make room for this? If the hot wire isn't long enough to do that, is it ok to use a wire nut and lengthen it?
Also, yes I plan on buying a 12000W Generator and a 50amp breaker to run it. I will then run 6 guage wire from my basement to my garage and install a plug outside with a weatherproof case around it and a lock.
So I need to call an electrical supply house and tell them I need a interlock kit for a Square-D Homeline panel? Is that the exact name? If I can get one of these, then this would probably be the best and cheapest option then, thanks.

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> So to be able to do that, it sounds like I would have to move breakers > 2 & 4 to the bottom to make room for this? If the hot wire isn't long > enough to do that, is it ok to use a wire nut and lengthen it? > > Also, yes I plan on buying a 12000W Generator and a 50amp breaker to > run it. I will then run 6 guage wire from my basement to my garage and > install a plug outside with a weatherproof case around it and a lock. > > So I need to call an electrical supply house and tell them I need a > interlock kit for a Square-D Homeline panel? Is that the exact name? > If I can get one of these, then this would probably be the best and > cheapest option then, thanks. >
Sparty The custom on Usenet is to post replies at the bottom of any quoted material. It makes the conversation easier for others to follow.
Yes it is OK to splice in the panels wiring trough.
When you say that you will "install a plug outside" what do you mean? You can install a cord that is spliced right on to the cable or you can install a flanged inlet which is the same pins as a plug end of a cord rigidly fastened to a mount to receive a receptacle cord cap. Do not install a receptacle at the supply end of the cable.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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Member, Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department wrote:

I would like to run 6 guage wire from my basement to my garage like I mentioned. I want to make this nice and clean looking. Then on the outside of my 3rd stall garage, I would like to have something that a generator can plug into, using an extension cord.
I would like to make about a 10 foot or so 6 guage extension cord. One side would plug into the generator and the other side to the plug, or whatever I need to install outside.
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Since the generator will be 12000 watts or fifty amperes your least expensive solution will be to Install a hard wired flexible cord from a suitably sized junction box at the garage end. That cord will have a male cord cap that matches the receptacle on your generator. Flanged inlets in the 240/120 volt fifty ampere pattern are expensive and hard to find.
--
Tom Horne

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Thomas D. Horne, FF EMT wrote:

I'm also thinking, since I'm considering a 12K Watt Generator, I should do 6 guage wire and a 60amp breaker/interlock kit, to handle the surge that could happen. Just in case, it surges to 13K or 14K Watts. I'll think about the junction box, and also look into the price of a flanged inlet to run the cord to.
Thanks, James
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sparty wrote:

You can get purpose-made generator sets at Home Depot and other places that come with the necessary hardware to comply with code and crank up and do the transfer automatically.
Use a proper transfer switch--you do _not_ want to be on the receiving end of the lawsuit when your non-code-compliant jury rig electrocutes the guy from the power company.
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--John
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As one that climbs poles (occasionally) for a living (>33-years), I am VERY pleased to see so many folks unanimously reply to the occasional DIY, would-be generator user insisting that a proper transfer switch is used.
Utility restoration following a bad storm is dangerous enough without having to worry (too much) about an ignorant generator user causing even more risk.
Virtually all "dead" power lines are bonded to ground prior to their being worked on, and other safety measures are employed (insulated gauntlets, hot sticks, etc) but there is always the risk of encountering an energized line.
A great bunch here, for sure. Thanks!
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:)
JR

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Jim Redelfs wrote:
Jim, if you are one of those who work on those lines ..... THANKS.
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Joseph Meehan

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Besides the code and practical conditions of electrically connecting it theres the BIGGIE!
Where are you going to store your fuel supply so its safe secure and sufficent to run the generator?
check the manufacturers specs its probably over 5 gallons per hour at low load....
a small generator just big enoufg to run a fridge OR gas furnace ORwell pump OR a small window AC unit plus a few lights and perhaps a tiny tv is all most need for camping out.
Big operators need a natural gas or propane generator.
i have a couple generators and have wrestled with these issues myself plus the noise of a generator running.
the best option is likely a car inverter 12 volts to 120 the cars fuel tank is the portable container.
remember in a widespread outage gas stations depend on electric to dispense pump gas...
sadly its not ust plug in the big hugger generator sit back and relax....
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Excellent comments posted regarding transfer switches, etc. But let's back up to the overall strategy:
1. All year long, you need refrigeration for food. During freezing weather, it can be placed in the garage in a cooler. 2. In the winter, you need heat. If your heat is electric, you may not have sufficient power for it. If it's gas-fired, it won't take much power to run the fan and thermostat. 3. In summer, you may want A/C, but you may not have sufficient power to run more than some fans. 4. The pump may be needed, depending on the season and weather.
A 9000 watt generator fueled by gasoline is fairly thirsty. Something like 3500-5500 watts with at least 6-10 hours runtime is probably a better choice. If you are iced in, you are not likely to be able to obtain more fuel except to siphon from vehicles. You may need 5-6 gallons of fuel every 8 hours (for example) for the outage duration. That's 18 gallons per day. Flammable fuel storage will be an issue.
Consider supplementing your electrically powered items with things like coolers, camp stoves, fish cookers, gas grills, camping lanterns and battery-powered fans. Creating total dependency on a single generator and its fuel supply does not allow a backup plan.
Determine what the longest power outage has been in the past 5-10 years and plan accordingly. You will also need to perform periodic maintenance and fuel replacement for whatever solution is implemented. It cannot just sit on the floor or shelf until the instant of need.

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