Running gas line to HW heater

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If everyone pulled a permit and got inspections, Home Depot would be out of business and there would not be enough inspectors to go around.
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You make those sound like bad things.
R
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There is a Tee at that point that continues on to feed my gas stove and dryer. The only way to eliminate that Tee is to disconnect everything from the kitchen on back, which is a lot of pipe and fittings. So a cap or plug is the easiest solution. It would not be buried entirely in the wall. I actually have to drop the ceiling a little at that point due to the other pipes, so I could put in an access door to get to it.
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Uniform Mechanical Code 805.1 An angle greater than 45 degrees from the vertical is considered a horizontal run. The total horizontal run of a vent plus the length of horizontal vent connector shall not exceed 75 percent of the vertical height of the vent.
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I'm assuming you are talking about the flue pipe? What issues do you see? The new HW heater is close to the chimney, about 11'' away, and 6" down to the flue connector on the HW heater
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I don't think anyone knows what she's talking about either. That vent run, in terms of pitch, connection, etc looks like mine and dozens of others I've seen. Only thing that is different is whatever that rectangular looking gizmo is on the vent near the heater.
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There might be. Without seeing what feeds what I can't give an honest opinion.
Normally a 3/4" line feeds two 1/2" lines because there is a limit to how much gas can flow through a given pipe size. By feeding both units from a single line you may starve one or both units when they cycle on at the same time.
The size of the pipe each unit needs is determined by the BTU input rating of the device AND the length of the total pipe run.
You may want to gather more information and compare what you have and what you need to the specs contained on this page: http://www.gpta.net/Classes/Gas%20sizing/Gaspipe%20Sizing.pdf
--
Colbyt
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On Sat, 22 Jan 2011 20:37:22 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

I don't know, but it looks odd to me. My basement is similar to yours, with the gas supply running up near the joists. Similar furnace and HW tank placement too. The difference is the drops to the furnace and HW tank. Can't see the original drop to your old tank.
On mine that's a straight drop from the reducer so the pipe runs a few inches off the tank, parallel. There's a couple 90's, nipples and a union at the bottom to bring it to the front HW tank gas connection.
For the furnace the reducer it faced horizontal, and maybe a foot of pipe brings it over about a foot near the joists, then a 90 drops it straight down with alongside the furnace. There's a 90 level with the furnace gas feed to bring it in. So the big difference is there are no gas pipes to trip over and break down low, and none in the way.
Good thing too, since my furnace access panel faces the wall. I know if I were re-piping any gas I would keep as much pipe near the joists as possible. Since you're closing that in and have no need to get back there, you're probably ok. I really don't like that unsupported 90 in the corner. There are scenarios where an oaf falls down back there on his ass and the pair of pliers in his back pocket snags it. Maybe you can't imagine those scenarios, but I can (-:
On the subject of gas feeds, here's how mine works. It's circa 1959, and was code then. Near the furnace the main line (1 1/4" I think) reduces to 3/4" for the furnace drop and straight on. That's the first hit. The furnace drop is further reduced to 1/2" at the furnace.
Next the 3/4" has a reduced 1/2" drop to the HW tank. A bit further there's a full 3/4" tee feeding up to the kitchen. After that there's a reduced 1/2" run and drop to the dryer.
What's this tell me? Not too much. Full volume reduced to 3/4" at the furnace, which takes a 1/2" feed. Maybe the original furnace took more.
1/2" to HW tank and dryer. It works. 3/4" to kitchen stove? That's a bit puzzling. Only thing I can figure is the gas company engineers' wives actually cooked back in the day, so they wanted to stay on the right side of them with consistent oven temps.
--Vic
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