Running Gas Heater Ducts to the Garage

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A two-story house is currently heated everywhere except the garage. The gas heater is located in the basement right behind the garage, which is on the floor above the basement. Instead of a portable electirc heater, wouldn't running heating ducts from the regular gas heater to the garage be the best solution?
We've seen heating ducts that have a valve the blocks circulation 100%, such valves are located inside the house. We would use the valve to completely block heat circulation to the garage when unneeded. What would be the best kind of duct and blocking mechanism to add regular heating to this garage?
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New Question wrote:

Bad idea. Furnace may not have adequate capacity. *Huge* danger of CO poisoning in the house from sources in the garage. Duct compromises the fire safety of the house/garage interface.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@nq.com says...

Probably not, for two reasons.
The existing furnace is sized to handle the cubic footage of the house. Adding the garage will probably over-tax the furnace, causing excessively long run times and shortened life-span.
In addition to the hot air, you must also provide a cold air return. If you don't do so (from the garage) you'll effectively create a vacuum in the house, causing outside air to be drawn in thru every crack and hole it can find. The amount of heat getting into the garage (if it's reasonably air-tight) will also be reduced because it will effectively have positive pressure.
So in summary, if you add a cold air return to the garage, it will work to some degree, but you'll probably be over- taxing the furnace.
--
Mark

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A couple things to consider here:
If you duct air into the garage, you are removing air from the house interior. This will mean you furnace will suck cold air from someplace else.. Your furnace is a closed circuit air circulating system.. At the same time you will be pressurizing the garage and the warm air will be lost through the door gaps, etc. never to be recirculated to your furnace.
The other concern would be gasoline vapors for any car in the garage.. If you duct the garage air back to the furnace, you could have an explosion.. only takes a minor leak, few drops.
You should check code about this..
Steve
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New Question wrote:

I read somewhere, years ago, that heated garages are really bad for cars. The issue, as I remember is when the warm car goes out into a cold climate that the rapid temperature change causes problems with paint integrity, leading to rust problems.
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Thanks for the replies.
Given the potential danger of running ducts to a garage, what is the best way to heat a garage?
Electric, propane, kerosine, solar?
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What kind of climate? How often do you intend to heat it? Keeping it warm all the time versus heating it for an hour or two will make a difference. In most areas, electric is the most expensive method.
I have a detached garage. I insulated most of it and use a 30,000 Btu propane heater. Keeps it very comfortable when the temperature is 20. Below that it is OK to work in, but not as toasty as the house. Open flame heaters can be problematic if you have gasoline and paint thinners out there. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, What kind of insulation does the garage have? I am in Alberta. R12 all around including doors. I don't use it as work shop. Even in cold winter days(temp. ~-30C) I don't have any problem with my cars or ourselves. If you really want to heat it, overhead gas heater might be best bet. Tony
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I not familar with the insulation rating, but it is the pink stuff in bags stuffed between the studs. Which brands of the overhead gas heater is best and how much do they cost?
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warm
The garage is in a southern state, but I'm looking for a general strategy to have a permant source of heat for a garage in any climate.
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Radiant.
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best
Which one?
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Radiant Floor Heat.
My apologies, as I should have been more specific.
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How does radiant floor heat relate to "a gas fired boiler and pex tubing in the floor". Are they the same thing or different methods?
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Try www.radiantec.com
under-floor radiant heat is typically hot-water based boiler or water heater, a manifold, and plastic PEX or other tubing installed under the floor.
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in
That's it. You can have radiant walls and ceilings too.
Go to www.wirsbo.com for some good, correct information. Wirsbo has a group of trained people that can come out and install a good system for you that will be guaranteed to work properly. Some of these people will let you do the basic labor which can save you money on the install.
There are internet companies that will sell you the material so you can do the install yourself, but I'd recommend staying away from them. Their information is not always correct
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The best way and the most practical are often two differant things. Starting with new construction I would go with a gas fired boiler and pex tubing in the floor.
Considering that you have gas relativly close, I would put in a hanging, gas fired, vented, unit heater in the garage. Greg
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Starting
gas
Which brands of the gas fired boiler and unit heaters would you recommend and how much do they cost?
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in
Simply ones that are properly installed! A good unit installed improperly will be junk. A poor unit installed prperly may last for years. Price will vary with your area. Shop around, hanging unit heters can be bought at home stores and homeowners may be able to install it themselves. The gas lines can also be done by a homeowner in most places. BUT, if you are unsure of your abilities it is best to have it done by a pro. Check with your local building inspections office. A small gas leak, a ignition source, boom, no more house! Greg
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New Question wrote:

I've got a Modine heater, designed for garages in my shop, works great! Link: http://hot-dawg.modine.com /
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