Running electrical wire through PVC pipe

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wrote:

Romex is a brand name for one manufacturer's NM, which is what you have.
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"Romex" is a brand name. The 12-2 NM-B specification is more important than the brand name. (12-2 will support up to 20 amps for typical runs).
I used the term Romex as that's how most folks refer to it, even though it may be made by other manufacturers. Just like tissues are often called "Kleenex", even though many other companies make them.

That sounds OK to me. Based on the correction "Bud" supplied, you could run a single NM-B cable in the large conduit now. If you ever need to run additional lines, you could pull that cable, install junction boxes top and bottom, and run individual wires in the conduit. Or, go ahead and transition now to save future work.
Better yet, dedicate the 1-1/2 inch line to data needs, and install additional 3/4" conduit runs for future power runs. I would cap any unused lines to keep out insects and drafts.
Oh, and just for clarification, make sure you use grey colored PVC "conduit" and not white PVC water pipe. You wouldn't want someone cutting into what they think is a water line, only to cut into power or data cables.

I mounted in-wall speakers in our living room, but did not use conduit for those lines. It's unlikely I would ever need to relocate the speakers, and if I did it would involve drywall work anyway. But, if you plan to move things around often, or future access would be difficult, the conduit will really make things easier.
Note: If you run speaker cables in the wall, make sure you use speaker cables listed for that purpose. I think it's "CL-2" cable with a fire retardant outer jacket that also makes it easier to pull.

I installed a double-gang sized box on each wall of our living room and every bedroom, with two 3/4" conduits running to our crawlspace. These are for data purposes only. It's not always easy to forsee how furniture might be moved around, and it's not a big cost to add a few more boxes to simplify changes later.
A few of the boxes have gone unused, but I've been surprised how much I've needed most of them. I've run cat5 cables through most of them to connect the computers in various rooms. Two other cat5 cables run to our living room for my blu-ray player and a network media streamer (lets me watch TV shows recorded on the PC in my office).
Install blank cover plates on the boxes you don't use. Special plates with "keystone" jacks let you run all sorts of connections. For instance, the box in my office has two cable lines (one from cable TV, one from an outdoor antenna), two phone lines, and two cat5 ethernet lines.
There isn't anyplace in the house I regret installing the boxes, but I do wish I had installed additional boxes in the home-office, our bedroom, and even the kitchen. I quickly ran out of ports for my home network, so I worked around that by installing a network switch in the crawlspace (I was fortunate to have a power outlet available there). I didn't forsee the need to run much data to the bedroom, so I didn't plan ahead well enough there. I've already had to fish a couple of extra cables in the last five years. A box and conduit would have made things much easier.
Of course, about a month after I ran network cables to every room, I bought a wireless router and don't need the wired connections for my laptop now. :) But the wired connections are still used between desktop PC's and the media devices in our living room. Nice thing about the conduit, I can easily pull out the unused network cables and feed something else in if my needs change later.
Anthony
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Thanks for all that information.
Heck, I was going to run 4 of the 12-2 NB wires through that 1-1/2 inch by 10 ft long pipe. It is the gray pipe used for electrical runs, btw. Looks like that could be a problem, eh?
Thanks, David
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(4) is the maximum number of 12-2 NM-B cables you can bundle together (e.g. run through a sleeve like you are doing) and still maintain the 20 amp capacity (assuming no other correction factors, like elevated ambient temperature). So you are fine, just don't put a 5th one in there. As for the sleeve, you can use whatever material is convenient.
Cheers, Wayne
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Oops, I need to amend that. The one wrinkle is that you normally have to support your NM cable every 4.5 feet (NEC 334.30). The allowable exceptions are (1) you are doing remodel work and fishing the cable (NEC 334.30(B)(1)) or (2) you are running the cable inside a raceway (the NEC term for conduit) that provides protection from physical damage.
So, if your wall is open, and you are installing a sleeve and running NM cable in the sleeve, then you have to use a raceway, like PVC electrical conduit. But if you are doing remodel work, and come across an existing unused pipe in a finished wall, you can fish your wire down it without regard to what the sleeve is made of.
Cheers, Wayne
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OK, so running four 12-2 NM B cables in the 1-1/2 inch conduit. Again, I already have the gray conduit specifically meant for electrical.
I am not sure how I can support the wire every 4 1/2 feet inside the conduit. How is that done? The whole of the 10 feet of conduit will be vertical, btw.
Also, what is a good way to tag the wires so I would know what each wire goes to as they exit the conduit?
Thanks, David
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hibb wrote:

"344 Non-metallic sheathed cable: Types NM, .... [commonly called Romex] 344.30 Securing and Supporting. ...4 1/2 ft...12 inches.... Sections of cable protected from physical damage by raceway shall not be required to be secured withing the raceway."
I would think an inspector would view a raceway used to fish cables the same as one used for physical protection.
Can't remember if "raceway" has been defined in this thread, but it is a hollow wiring method installed without wires that wires are added to - like PVC conduit.
--
bud--

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A sharpie pen works great for writing identifications on the outer covering of NM-B cables. If you're feeding multiple cables at once, you can write the ID on the cables first, then feed them through the conduit, something that wouldn't work well with adhered tags or labels.
Anthony
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wrote:

You do not usually need to support cables in a conduit, certainly not every 4 1/2 feet. There are rules about vertical runs but for copper 18ga thru 8 ga it is a vertical run over 100' that needs supplemental support. Table 300.19(A)
Electricians usually use different colors of tape to identify cables and conductors.
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No, that is the point, if you use the gray electrical conduit, you don't have to support the NM cable every 4 1/2 feet inside the conduit.
Cheers, Wayne
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Great. I think I am good to go now.
Thanks, David
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Maybe I missed something here, but based on what Wayne and Bud said, it sounds to me like you could run four 14-2 Romex through a single conduit.
Wayne: "In terms of overheating, you need to watch how many current carrying conductors (CCCs) you run together for a significant length. If you have too many together you have to "derate" each conductor so that it carries less current, or alternatively upsize the conductor for a given current. The rules are complicated, and derating potentially starts at 4 CCCs. However, for NM cable in #14 and #12 sizes, you can run up to 9 CCCs and still maintain the usual 15A and 20A capacities, respectively"
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Thanks again to everyone for helping me work through these problems.
David
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