Running Electric, Phone and Television lines

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I am putting the new electric, phone lines and television cable into a new addition. I was wondering if the phone line or TV cable touches the electric wires when they criss cross each other will the electric wire cause any interferance in either the phone line or TV?
If this can cause interferance, what would be the minimum distance between those lines to be sure one does not cause a problem with the other.
Thanks, David
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There is a lot of urbal legend about this but the short answer is you won't have a problem with coax or twisted pair. If you have the old style untwisted phone wire and you ran next to the power for a long distance you might pick up some hum. If you think about it, your phone runs next to power lines for miles ... but the wire on the pole is twisted
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there are code rules about running low voltage lines along 120 power lines.to prevent cross connection and shock hazard
interference shouldnt be a issue.
you know things change frequently, like for phone catergory 5e might be a better choice, and use RG6 low loss for cable and dont bury anything like boxes or splitters in a cieling you cant reach
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wrote:

As long as they are still in the cable jacket they are separated according to the NEC. It is when you split the wires out of the cable jacket, like in a box, that you need additional separation. There is even one style of Romex that has low voltage and line voltage in the same cable (type NM-S) but you will have a hard time finding it.
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Gee I THOUGHT I read somehere that low voltage cable like doorbell wire wasnt allowed to be ran alongside power lines.
learn something new every day
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I think you are referring to situations where people run the low voltage cables (telephone, computer, door bell, intercom, alarm systems etc.) through, say, the same holes in joists as the electrical wiring etc,. So in that case they are alongside, in parallel and in contact with the insulated electric wires. Usually doesn't cause a problem but it's not good practice? Separate holes and separation of at least a few inches is wiser.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sure, but they aren't bundled together or even come in contact with each other.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not where I live. The power lines run at the top of the pole, the phone and cable lines run across the middle.
It also matters whats on the end of the power lines. A noisy appliance like an old motor could be a problem. But phone lines are really not that low of a voltage that I would worry about that.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Here is a reference from the TIE/EIA-570-A Residential Telecommunication Cabling Standard:
"8.1 3.1 Separation distance from electrical power Separation of telecommunications cable with respect to electrical power conductors shall meet applicable electrical codes. Additionally, when telecommunications cable containing metallic elements (e.g., UTP, coaxial cable) is placed alongside unshielded electrical power conductors inside wall space or ceiling space, it shall have a minimum separation of 50.4 mm Q in) from power wire."
Also your local codes (possibly NEC) may have other requirements. You can check with your building/electrical inspector or the AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction).
Joe Golan, RCDD -------------------------------------
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Cripes. Did they really say "50.4". Point 4? millimeters? That's as bad as a cookbook I have that called for 453.6 kg of chicken.
-Kevin
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whats that in inches?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

1.9843 ;-)
--
Keith

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Thanks everybody.
There is only a few places where the lines cross close enough that I can't keep them at least a couple of inches apart so I ran one of the wires through a short section of PVC pipe in those intersections.
We get a lot of statric in our phone lines. I always thought it was the crappy service lines run to the house but now I am wondering if part of the problem is where the phone line runs into the house within a few feet of our electric breaker box.
Thanks again!
David
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The only thing you could get from the power lines is a 60hz hum. Static is a loose connection.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Noise can also be from the phone service wiring - including 'wet cables' with old (cloth?) insulation. There are a number of bad pairs in the underground cable that surfaces behind my garage. Many installations will have a point where the phone line enters the house where you can unplug the interior phone wiring and plug in a phone to test if the problem is inside the house or in the TELCO wiring.
Presumably computer signal cables can pickup noise from running across flourescents (and other arc-discharge lighting?). Probably to a high frequency for phone.
bud--
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Bud-- wrote:

Old lines is probably the problem. I did complain a few years ago and they fixed it but it was back in couple of weeks. I am lucky if I can sign on the internet at 2600 BPS. They ran new lines in my Brother-In-Law's neighborhood about 5 miles from me and he can sometimes get over 40000 BPS. SBC has no plans to upgrade around here so we can get high speed internet.
Thanks, David
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Age itself has nothing to do with it. There is still plenty of paper insulated, lead-sheathed cable from the 1920s & 1930s providing good service.
Deteriorated insulation SOMEWHERE is the cause of the noise on your line.

You should have promptly reported the trouble again. ...and again, if necessary. Then there's your state's Public Service Commission that will take your complaint if your carrier won't fix the trouble.
You're paying for good service. It's too bad that things have changed to the point where you MUST be your own advocate ("squeaky wheel") but it's a fact. Submit reports until the trouble is fixed.

That's pathetic. :(

New lines have nothing to do with it. CLEAN lines do. They replaced the old cable because the cost to maintain the old cable finally exceeded the cost of replacement. The old cable must have been beyond TERRIBLE for that to happen.

Lemme guess: You live in the country. I'll bet your "local" CATV provider is no where NEAR your home and may never be.
SBC certainly has plans to *EVENTUALLY* offer high-speed internet service in your area. They are simply deploying first closer to the Central Office (or remote terminal) than further away.
There is a smaller, unincorporated community in the area I service. They would LOVE to get DSL. We'll get there eventually. Understandably, it isn't SOON ENOUGH for them.
Even at the furthest distance from the C.0., you should get dial-up connections in the 26k range on a good pair. Give 'em hell, Harry.
--
:)
JR

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That's a nice touch. However, doing so probably provides mechanical protection more than anything else. POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) lines are regularly run within CLOSE proximity to power lines with NO ill effect.

Static, if it is on ALL your telephones, is probably caused by a fault in your telco's facilities, possibly MILES away from your home. You should report the trouble to your provider so they can fix it. You're paying TOO much for your service to put up with it.
--
:)
JR

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Kevin, did you say Kg? That's a lot of chicken! Must be a Saudi recipe, where I read once they cook for hundreds over gas flares.
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Let's see, 1 kilo gram = 2.2 pounds, so that's 453.6 x 2.2 = 997.92 pounds of chicken! When did you get this cook book from, the Mess Hall of the 101st Airborne Division, or Colonel Sanders?!
Jay
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