Running cable through an outside wall

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Though, I haven't taken a good look yet to the possibility of this but how difficult is it to run cable through an outside wall on a bungalow? It was a small addition to the kitchen on the back of the house (was there when we purchased). Below it is a crawlspace and above it is an attic which doesn't appear to have an access, not even through the main attic space, It's puzzling as to how I will get in there.
I know it's difficult to answer without seeing, but all suggestions are appreciated.
Thank you
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It depends upon where you are running to and from. The wall cavity is probably hollow, except for insulation. There is probably a double 2x4 at the top of the wall and a plate at the bottom

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What kind of cable are you talking about?
Is the whole wall brick?
Andy
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wrote:

What kind of cable are you talking about?
Is the whole wall brick?
Andy
Television cable. No bricks.
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Insulation is the usual problem in an outside wall. Depending on the type, it can make it difficult or impossible
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SBH wrote:

Trivial. You need a long ( 1 foot) 1/2" bit, a coat-hanger, and a pair of pliers.
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You'll also need cable (I can't get the proper name off the tip of my tongue) "whatevers". You thread the cable through and then push it into the opening on the ouside of the house. Serves to seal the opening and secure the cable to the house. MLD

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Grommets? Most of the cable installers around here just use a tube of caulk.
Red
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wrote:

and pull it back through. Then seal the hole with caulk.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Running coax on outside of house and through wall is the hillbilly way to do it. Fast and cheap, which is why it is so popular, but it looks like crap. And the more coax and connectors you have exposed to the weather, the quicker it fails.
-- aem sends...
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On Thursday, June 11, 2009 6:12:28 PM UTC-4, aemeijers wrote:

Then by all means, provide your non-"hillbilly" solution to his problem.
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On 1/26/2014 6:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I realize you hillbillies are sensitive. Maybe you could read the rest of the thread 4 1/2 years ago.
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On 01/26/2014 06:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: X

What's really hilarious...on another group some idiot replied to a five year old post and the OP actually responded and said something like, "problem solved". I think it was the antique radio group or something like that.
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On Sun, 26 Jan 2014 04:52:00 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

aemeijers has nothing to prove to a nooble like you. He was a poster par excellence, and I hope wherever he is, he's posting happiily.
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On Sun, 26 Jan 2014 04:52:00 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

exposed. When I bought my house the telephone cable to the upstairs was run on the outside surface of the brick lower storey, and in through the aluminum siding upper floor walls. After 40 years I started getting noise on the line so I disconnected it and now have only cordless phones on the upper floor.
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wrote:

(operator of the phone system in the former British colony of Northern Rhodesia) installed the phone cable into a friend's house - through the keyhole of the front door. They were given the key to the side door to get in so "ASS U ME d" the front door was not being used - - - - - -.
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I guess it depends on what you mean by "through" the wall.
"Through the wall" could mean bringing the wire from outside the bungalow into the room or "through the wall" could mean from one location inside the bungalow to another location inside the bungalow.
Please clarify.
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wrote:

I guess it depends on what you mean by "through" the wall.
"Through the wall" could mean bringing the wire from outside the bungalow into the room or "through the wall" could mean from one location inside the bungalow to another location inside the bungalow.
Please clarify.
Thanks for the reminder. After reading the replies, I see what you mean.
My apologies for the lack of details.
I want to run/add a television cable from the already existing terminal located in the basement, up through the floor to the kitchen inside the exterior wall. The same as you would for any other type of outlet (phone, switch, etc.) through the floor and inside an interior wall such as a bedroom. Not running a cable from the outside to inside, but all inside. I have run cables, phone lines, electrical wiring, etc. through many other walls in this house as well as others, but never inside a wall which is the exterior wall of a house. Therefore, I have no idea if there's much of a difference. Viewing the joists in the basement it just seems a bit difficult to gain access. It appears the thickness of the wall lies on the foundation and makes it difficult to snake any type of wiring.
Thanks again.
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wrote:

It can be difficult or impossible to drill up into an exterior wall cavity from below if the foundation is too thick. If you can see any other cables drilled up from below, in that same area, you can use their location as a guide. You don't want to come up through the floor or through the siding

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I'm guessing you have at least the height of the floor joists along the ext wall in the basement to "work" and can see up to the bottom of the floor. Do you just need to go a foot or two up from the floor into the kitchen wall where a "normal" tv cable outlet would be? Otherwise, if you're going up to above "counter height" for a TV/monitor (say, mounted on a cabinet etc) you would run into fireblocking. Also, if the home has a vapor barrier on the exterior walls, you should try to avoid damaging it and the insulation.
If the desired location is standard (just about 16" above the kitchen floor), what I've done is mark the location in the kitchen (after using a stud finder) ..find the corresponding space between the basement studs and ensure theres nothing there a drill bit will hit, then cut a hole in the kitchenwall the size of a standard "EZ" box.
Then (I have two installer's drill bits..one is 3' long and the other is 6' long. They are a long flexible shaft with a pointed "spade" type bit on the end) I'd take the 3 footer, make a small hole in the vapor barrier and carefully feed the drillbit DOWN (by hand) into the wall to the bottom plate thru the hole you' ve cut. Measure along the shaft to make sure you're "resting" on the plate and not on something else that may be in the wall. The drill-end of the bit would be sticking out of the hole, against the sheetrock at about 20-30 degrees due to its natural curve and the 'bit-end' should be almost vertical and perpendicular to/against the plate. Apply drill to bit and drill the hole while a 'helper' keeps an eye out for the bit in the basement.
Going in this way (down) keeps the damage to the vapor barrier/insulation to a minimum. Once the hole is drilled, connect a thin piece of cord to the drillbit (it has a hole thru it just for that purpose) and pull the cord/ wire back up thru the hole and into the kitchen. You may be able to rent such a bit or buy one at HD/Lowes etc.

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