Running AC and cable tv (coax) in exterior walls

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I want to mount an LCD TV above an 8 foot wide door in my bedroom. I have to run the wires in the finished exterior insulated wall and had a few questions.
1) From what I read it is okay to notch load bearing wall provdes the notch is less than 25% of the depth of the stud. Correct?
2) Is it safe to notch the door header (that way I can run the cables in the gap between the door and the rough opening)? If so how much?
3) I know runing audio cables in the same notch as the AC cable is not a good idea. What about coax cable (for cable TV)? I really do not want to notch and repair two notches per stud.
Thanks.
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If the ceiling height is above 8', you'll probably have cat beams at around 4'. The door header may not be solid to the sheetrock. I would try to snake up the wall next to the door then try to open the sheetrock and drill the studs adjacent to the header and see if there is room to snake between the header and the sheetrock
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RBM wrote:

Dumb question- what is a cat beam?
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pieces of 2x installed horizontally between the studs for stiffeners
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RBM wrote:

Oh. Back when I swung a hammer for money, we simply called that blocking or cross-bracing. Perhaps a regional term? Google didn't find it.
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We call it bridging if it's in the ceiling.
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aka Firestops
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wrote:

Cat beams are always noticed due to the sound they make. Listen carefully and you will hear them purring. If you open a can of tuna fish, they will begin saying MEOW MEOW MEOW.....
There you have it. You learned something new today and now have an enhanced education. Pat yourself on the back, and treat yourself to a cold drink or a hot woman !!!!
Zorro
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noname87 wrote:

Bad idea for lots of reasons. It seems like a good idea for while lying in bed, but it is way too high for sustained viewing. And during the day, light through the door will make the screen hard to see. You can center-drill studs to 25%, but notching a whole row of studs that deep weakens the whole wall. If wall is that high, I assume this is a cathedral ceiling? Feeding from attic into that stud bay would be a lot better, but you probably don't have an attic above. Second best would be to feed up from basement into the stud bay beside the door, remove a strip of drywall above door, and center-drill the studs to the mounting point. Do you have drapes on this door wall? You could retrim the doorway and make the casing a little wider, and create a wooden raceway around the door to run the cables through, by slotting the drywall under it. (May have to retrim the other doors in the room to match visually, if the drapes don't disguise the door trim well enough.)
As much as it pains me to throw business their way, you may wanna pay a visit to local dealer that sells the brackets and fittings- they may have better ideas. Or ask over in alt.hometheater, or whatever the appropriate group is called.
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*I agree with RBM. It is better to open up the drywall. I am not sure where you are running the wires from, but if it is a horizontal run I would cut a length of drywall out about 5" wide and as long as you need to go in one long piece. That way you can drill holes in the middle of each stud. If you will be bringing the wires down from the attic you can cut a hole big enough to get your drill in and drill up through the top plate. Then push a fish tape up into the attic space and go up and tie your wire onto it.
I would keep the two cables in separate holes.
Cut your drywall at a 45 degree angle to make it easier for patching. http://www.wd40jobsite.com/secret_detail.cfm?idt8&c=1&q=&s=1
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First time I saw that tip, it was a true forehead-smacker. (why didn't I think of that before....)
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Me too. Good idea. WW
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When you replace the plug, it'll be a bit recessed due to the width of the kerf. I prefer a square cut and to hot melt a couple of wood strips across the opening. Then, set them firm with drywall screws. This makes it easy to screw the removed plug back in place.
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*To prevent the piece from being too recessed I normally butter both wall and piece edges heavily with joint compound. A finish coat a day or two later with a wide knife makes it perfect and no taping is required thanks to the angle cuts.
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They make metal clips to facilitate puttig in patch pieces. Do they work?
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*I don't think I have ever seen them.
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 11:39:38 -0400, "John Grabowski"

I bought a set, to have on hand, in that great hardware store in Dallas, and I think also I saw them in an Ace hardware.
They're black, from flat metal, but bent with teeth, prongs, at one end, a set of four, bent in a way to go both behind and a litte before the sheetrock that's still there, and behind the patch, iirc, and then after everythign dries to snap off the rest of it by bending back and forth, iirc. I guess the part before, that you could see, either breaks off or it has to covered by compound.
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I just screw the wood strips to the drywall and plug.
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On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 15:13:04 -0700 (PDT), noname87

You can probably test this by running all the same wires outside of the wall, on the floor if necesary, as close as they would be with one notch. Tape them together. I presume AC means air conditioning. Test them by running the AC, turn it down enough that the compressor goes on too, and at the same time running the tv on all stations you'll be watching. Test the audio this way too. Although if you say so, they say it's not a good idea, the world is a complicated place and I've seen lots of things that aren't supposed to work, work, (counting everything, not especially in electronics)
For example, I have the tv in this room connected to the DVDR in another room and a set top box in this room. I tried using channel 3 for one and channel 4 for the other, but there was interference, so for most of the time since the digital conversion, I've been using an A-B coax switch to switch inputs. Just 35 minutes ago, I was getting the same thing on either A or B, and neither was the set-top box. I went to another room connected to the DVDR and that wasn't it either. It was playing a signal that came from neither source, and the same thing on both A and B. How could that possibly happen?
I had to turn the tv off and on, and then everything was back to normal.

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mm wrote:

Uh, no, he means the a.c. power line to power the TV with. Not gonna be any hvac ducts in an exterior wall, unless the builder was an idiot.
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