Running a new sewer line

I'm planning on running a new sewer line myself. Is 4" schedule 40 sufficient for sewer line when it's buried to a depth of 10-12ft? What about coupling the pieces of pipe together? Are glued couplers sufficient, or should the joints have rubber sleeves over them in addition to glued couplers?
TIA,
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Joe Michel
NAR 82797 L2
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Where I live they use 4 inch ABS for sewer lines. You had better check with your local requirements before you dig. Primer and glue.
10-12 feet deep is really down there. You will need to open the trench at ~ 8 feet wide to get that deep. (Osha trenching requirements)
Have you verified that the sewer tap is actually that deep?
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Glue is fine. The big concern would be the depth you are working. OSHA requires ditch shoring at 4 feet, you are well below that. Why so deep? What kind of soil? What kind of machinery?
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I should have been more specific. This is new construction. The soil is hard clay, and we have a backhoe for the digging. I want to have a 1/2 bath in the basement and run the sewer out under the footing. The line is deep because I'd like to avoid using a sump pump for the basement drain plumbing if possible.
I guess I'll have a sump pump for the draintile around the foundation, so I could use that instead. I just hate the idea of a sewage backup in the basement because the sumper decided to go belly-up. Suggestions?
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Joe Michel
NAR 82797 L2
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exits from your basement wall. Around here, 2-3 feet below grade is common, so basement bathrooms aren't.
aem sends, wishing they would put a deep sewer line in here, so he could get the long-abandoned basement floor drains working.....
aem sends...
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The sewer main out in the alley is 11ft deep.
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Joe Michel
NAR 82797 L2
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 20:16:12 -0500, "J.A. Michel"

A second 'emergency' or backup sump pump.
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J.A. Michel wrote:

If you will be tying into a municipal sewer system, their regs will rule.
They may ask for: Specific soil prep/support. Slope requirement. Pipe larger than 4". Pipe material. Glued vs. O-ring joints (typical for sewer work). Location of Test Tees. Testing procedure. Backfill. Authority for final tap-in.
Do the homework with the town/county/whoever.
Jim
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I tried. The village guy wasn't much help. The only requirement is a 100.00 connect fee. None of the other things you mention are required.
I live in a small town, so there's not much in the way of inspections and big-city requirements. I'm just wondering what's common for an installation of the type I described.

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PVC or ABS pipe is common, depending on where you live. PVC is used almost exclusively where I live, at my dad's ABS prevails. Use what ever in common in your area.
One thing you may want to know is how deep the main is in the street. If your sewer is lower than the main you will need a lift pump for the sewer line to "lift" it to the main. Greg
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