running a cable under the threashold?

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IOW- if someone had done that previously, and you were to discover it during some demo, how would you respond? Need restraint?
One conclusion- if you do it as proposed, make sure you don't leave a forwarding address. :')
J
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On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 11:54:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

Witness Protection Program comes to mind :-\\
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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One more: Dropping something on the threshold, and crushing it. People tend to carry large objects in and out of garages. Aluminum threshold extrusions aren't _that_ strong - a cinder block dropped from chest height would crush the extrusion and probably cause a short. The results could be rather spectacular.
It'd probably fail inspection under the workmanship clause.
Don't protective plates for wiring have to be 18ga steel or better? Not that this is the typical use for a protective plate (eg: cable too close to drywall face going thru a stud), I think an inspector would insist on at _least_ equivalent protection for something that will be as exposed to damage as much as a door threshold. Eg: steel conduit.
Note also that some codes consider a few inches above the floor in a garage as a hazardous location (gasoline fumes etc), and strongly discourage wiring that low.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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