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I am replacing the gas hot water heater and the stove/oven in my vacant rental with electric. Should I have the electrician run the new lines while these are still in place or should I have the installers of the new/used stove and heater put in the services for their unit? Or doesn't it matter? Seems like it would be easier if the space where the existing units are was vacant.
TIA
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Obviously it would be easier to do it without the appliances in the way. If it's not occupied, remove them first. But other than that, it really dont much matter.
You could probably do this yourself if you have the knowledge and it's alllowed by code to wire it yourself. All you need is a double pole breaker of the proper size (Usually 30A for a water heater and 50A for a range), use the proper gauge wire, and run it from the panel to the location of the appliance. For the range, you'll need the correct sized receptacle, which you mount to the wall behind the range. For the water heater, it gets direct wired to the WH.
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Yes you defiantly need Electrician to size the service and hook up "License one" which is require if you want insurance to be effective, and perhaps your city permit replacing something is one thing changing is other.
wrote in message wrote:

Obviously it would be easier to do it without the appliances in the way. If it's not occupied, remove them first. But other than that, it really dont much matter.
You could probably do this yourself if you have the knowledge and it's alllowed by code to wire it yourself. All you need is a double pole breaker of the proper size (Usually 30A for a water heater and 50A for a range), use the proper gauge wire, and run it from the panel to the location of the appliance. For the range, you'll need the correct sized receptacle, which you mount to the wall behind the range. For the water heater, it gets direct wired to the WH.
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 3:35:15 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

Can anyone cite a case where an insurance company didn't pay because an electrical installation was not done by a licensed electrician?
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On 04/20/2016 03:43 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If you do something really stupid like wiring an electric water heater with #14 wire and land it on a 30A breaker causing your house to burn down, your claim will most likely be denied.
Wire it to code or better and you'll likely be OK.
FWIW, it doesn't really cost that much more to do it right.
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On 4/20/2016 5:24 PM, Wally wrote:

Companies often pay for owner stupidity.
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 6:22:18 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's one of the main sources of homeowner claims and one of the main purposes of the insurance to beging with, isn't it?
Leave a pot on a burner, kitchen fire Fall asleep smoking, burn house down Leave bathtub running, flood house. Leave crap on sidewalk, fail to remove ice, granny falls
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 5:24:45 PM UTC-4, Wally wrote:

Show us an actual example. If this happens, in a country with 320 mil people, there should be cases galore.
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 5:24:45 PM UTC-4, Wally wrote:

Prove it.

That wasn't my point. We often hear people say things like "...if you want insurance to be effective" yet we never hear of a claim that was denied because a DIYer did it themselves - even if they did it wrong.
Do you actually know of a case where the claim was denied or are you just repeating what you *believe* to be true but no one has actually heard of happening?
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 3:43:17 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Often asked, never seen one case presented yet.
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On 4/20/2016 3:43 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I did web search. None found. Maybe wrong key words.
Water heater takes 10 gage copper, on a double 30.
range takes 6 gage, IIRC. On a double 50 breaker.
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I believe that I have give reasonable advice how are you guys want to take it; that is up to you? I have being trouble shooter for 37 years and I saw personally four distribution panels totally burn out, Yes this was industrial panels not domestic, one have taking sub station down three blocks way where Electricians have work three days 24 hours day to get it replace where I was sitting on my ass $110.00 hour waiting for them to give me power so I can continue with my work. all this because some smart ass wanted to save $10.00 it did not work it coast them 10 time if it was fix first time. There was others on three different places, but those because it on my side of machinery I was able to fix with in half day. My point is don’t try to save on Electrical component's it can come to bit you in the ass. Always give yourself margin of 15-25% more than you need when it come to power!!!
wrote in message wrote:

Obviously it would be easier to do it without the appliances in the way. If it's not occupied, remove them first. But other than that, it really dont much matter.
You could probably do this yourself if you have the knowledge and it's alllowed by code to wire it yourself. All you need is a double pole breaker of the proper size (Usually 30A for a water heater and 50A for a range), use the proper gauge wire, and run it from the panel to the location of the appliance. For the range, you'll need the correct sized receptacle, which you mount to the wall behind the range. For the water heater, it gets direct wired to the WH.
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 7:18:32 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

Tony944,
The convention in this group is to post inline where appropriate or to bottom post in general. Top posting is not the standard.
Thanks for listening!
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That's OK. Tony and I get along fine.
At least he trims text. . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
On 4/20/2016 8:07 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 1:59:46 PM UTC-4, KenK wrote:

Do you know if the "installers of the new/used stove and heater" even know how to install the circuits?
Are they licensed electricians?
Do you know if you need a permit/will they obtain it if so?
(I lean towards "No" as the answer to all three/four questions, but that's just me.)
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On 04/20/2016 12:59 PM, KenK wrote:

If you're not running them yourself, I'd get the electrician to do it first. Unless you're using a "real" appliance dealer who actually has somebody more than just a delivery boy or two, they'll likely have to sub it out, anyway. I've never seen delivery on appliances be anything more than a truck driver and beef with barely the ability to plug into an existing outlet. Pulling and installing a new service line to the locations would be _FAR_ out of their pay grade/competency.
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 1:59:46 PM UTC-4, KenK wrote:

First question is if it's replacing, then why do you need to run electric at all? If the existing circuit is of sufficient ampacity for the new stove, then you probably don't need to run anything. Second, unless it's a power vent water heater, or tankless, etc, you may not need AC for the gas water heater. You'd only need 240V for a tankless, the power vent type just plug into an AC receptacle.
If you do need to have wiring done, then IDK how it works where you are, but around here, the typical appliance installer folks from say a store, aren't going to run electric. Sounds like it's a two step process. Get an electrician to do the work, if it's necessary, then have the installers just hook it up when the new appliances arrive.
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I'd be concerned about liability in a rented unit if a non licensed person ran the electrical.
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On 4/20/2016 1:59 PM, KenK wrote:

Unless he is going to use the same holes in a wall or floor it won't make any difference.
IMO, you are downgrading the value of the place. The rest of the world is ditching electric in favor of more economical gas
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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 4:15:16 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Good point. I misread it and took it to mean that he was replacing an electric stove and a gas water heater. That's why I asked about the existing circuits and why he needed 240V for a gas heater. I agree, IDK why anyone would replace a gas water water heater with electric. The stove, I could see, based on preference. I prefer an electric oven, probably gas for a range. But if it's a rental, I don't see why he wants the added expense of running power for those two new appliances and an electric water heater costs substantially more to run. Also, depending on the service, the panel, etc, is it just putting in two new breakers or is it more than that? If it requires a subpanel or more, the cost goes up.
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