run my oil forced air furnace once a month in the summer to keep the furnace from rusting

I'm new to owning a home. Someone told me that I have to run my oil forced air furnace once a month in the summer to keep the furnace from rusting. Is this true? I have a hard time accepting this as I'm trying to cool the house off..why turn up the heat?
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Running it one a month wont help. High basement humidity will rust everything, you will notice your tools first, running it once a month only dries it out for a few hours, if your humidity is to high get a dehumidifier. But will it make it last longer, maybe not.
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We had oil forever when I was a kid, and my ex and everyone in her family has it still and I've never heard of that. I see from Google you should replace your filter once a month in the winter.
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clickclack wrote:

In short, the answer is NO. You are likely to increase any possible problem not reduce it.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Never heard of that.
Closest thing to that was running the car AC every 2-4 weeks in winter to keep the seals lubed so they don't dry out. How true is that? Dunno for a fact. Maybe another old wives tale.
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Al Bundy wrote:

It might have been true when A/Cs first came out, but later it didn't make any difference. The point is moot anymore because most modern vehicles run the A/C automatically under many heat settings, most common is the A/C running whenever the defrost is turned on. My pickup has about 8 settings and it runs the A/C with all but 3 settings.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

I own a 1988 Buick in mint condition. The A/C worked fantastic until this season, when it appears to have lost some R-12 as the clutch is short cycling the compressor. The problem is that the R-12 will have to be recovered and then it will need leak testing with a 700-micron or below vacuum drawn and then charged with a refrigerant replacement. The refrigerant hoses may need to be replaced for the new refrigerants. Your opinions... .
http://www.cooltop.net/autofrost.html What is the score on Autofrost/R-406A replacing R-12? http://www.cooltop.net/autofrost.html
I need all the information anyone has concerning not having to recover the R-12 yet! It could be just a clutch problem, I need to have it checked.
- udarrell - Darrell
--
Air Conditioning\'s Affordable Path to the "Human Comfort Zone Goal"
http://www.udarrell.com/air-conditioning-total-heat-enthalpy-latent-heat.html
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udarrell wrote:

Can't help much, but I can tell you that you can't trust even major car dealers on A/C repair. I had a clutch burn up on the A/C of a 1973 Pontiac, oil got on the pads and swelled them just enough to burn up the rubber attachments. I told them it burned up when I didn't have the A/C on. They told me I need a new compressor even though it was obvious that the compressor had nothing to do with the clutch burning up. The jerks fixed the clutch but didn't fix the idler bearing (which I asked them to include) and it seized in another 5-10,000 miles. Bought the tool and did it myself with a completely new bearing and clutch since the package cost about the same as one of the components.
If you are going to have someone do the work, I suggest you just buy a new car!
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