Run away cars

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On 3/12/10 3:00 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I was pulling out of a oil lube joint and my car's throttle stuck open. I hit the brakes and turn off the engine. Seems the high school grease monkeys forgot to put the oil cap back on and had it sandwiched between the throttle linkage and the hood. They were lucky I knew what I was doing as I only had a few feet clearance before I would have hit a big wall.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I had a 63 Dodge pickup the type built on the van chassis with the slant 6 between the seats. The clutch rod broke and I drove it all over the place to get home. If I had to stop, I would start it in first gear and drive away. That happened during the fun years when I had all the time and ENERGY in the world to tinker with vehicles. Sadly, no more, I would love to tinker but just don't feel like it.
TDD
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 21:29:56 -0600, The Daring Dufas

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I loved that thing, I would use the crane off the plow hitch of the 49 Ferguson tractor to reach in through the passenger door to pull the engine for tinkering. The worst problem was the little truck was light in the rear but did it ever have character. FUNKY is the word I was thinking of.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I had the throttle linkage/spring come apart on a '66 Chev van on the freeway. It didn't want to slow down. I reached over, unhooked the engine cover between me and the passenger seat, opened the cover and pushed the throttle to low as I exited. No problem.
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Bob F wrote:

It's astounding what one can do with an understanding of how the machines around you work. My 1980 Dodge van ran out of gas on the freeway and I pulled the engine cover and air cleaner then looked around the junk in the van for different aerosol sprays until I found a few that were combustible. I sprayed a phone equipment cleaner into the carb to get me running down the shoulder and got up on the road and hit 60 mph then coasted down an exit ramp to the driveway of a service station where I used starting fluid to pull up the driveway to the pump. I gassed up and went back to work. Simple huh? *snicker*
TDD
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But is does happen :). I blew the clutch servo in my F150 20 miles out in the boonies at a stop sign. Got it going by starting in gear and drove it back home over gravel/paved/major highway. Of course I know how to clutchless shift...
Harry K
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hearse (used as an ambulance and hearse in the UK during WWII) which had a 'crash box' (that's a manual with no synchromesh) back in the 1950s, have done the same thing you describe.
That vehicle had a handle sticking out front for starting the engine, which had been changed during WWII to a 1938 model, Bedford (that was the UK version of GMC) straight six. Years later we drove a 1963 GMC pickup in North America and its engine looked identical to the 1938 engine!
With clutch inoperative starting on a slight down-slope if possible (even the slope to the side of the road may help) and continuing in gear all time, because of no clutch control, one can get home to then work on the problem. Did that twice.
Also got a V.W 'bug' home one time with a broken throttle cable .............. a piece of string from the driver's window run around to the back of the vehicle actuated the carburetor. It was about 8 miles home and just drove along with the traffic 'pulling the string'.
Had a diesel VW Golf run away on me (in traffic) once; breathing it's own crankcase fumes on a hot day. Knew instantly what had happened! Declutched, engine raced like it was going to break apart, pulled into side of the road and with all brakes hard on stalled the engine by bringing in the clutch (hoping nothing would break!). It didn't and when things cooled down drove to the dealership who had the part (nothing more than a modified breather tube) to fix problem.
I think a lot of the problem is not knowing your vehicle; although this fly by wire stuff is somewhat scary. Recall meeting a factory manager one time with a broken down vehicle out in the country, we got him going to the nearest town by using a junk war surplus radio capacitor as a substitute for the one across the ignition distributor points. Nowadays my son plugs in his laptop to 'tune' his engine!
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 13:18:06 -0800 (PST), terry

Up to 1962, the engine WAS the same old stove-bolt 6. (235 and 261) In 1963 the new engines came on stream (194, and 230 - eventually also 250 inch)

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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 17:20:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My 1941 Chevy CK pickup and my 1946 Chevy CK pickup had a 216 inch inline 6 cylinder with a splash oiling system. They had a socket in the front of the engine, and a removable crank for emergency hand starting. That was the engine used throughout WWII and for several years after. The 235 was a later engine that had an oil pump.
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 19:48:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You are correct. Sorta. The original Chevy 6 was 194 cubic inches in 1929. In 1933 they went to 2 different engines - the 181 and the 207 (206.8) This was known as the "cast iron wonder" In '37 they went to 216.5. inches. The "stove bolt" six. ALL of these engines had an oil pump, however - but they were not full pressure systems. The pump oiled the timing gears and rockers, and put oil in a 'oil trough" that sprayed the connecting rods. The actual oil pressure specification for '32 to '34 is 14 PSI at 30mph. 1935 and 36 is 12 psi at 50 mph, and 1937-39 is 13 psi at 50 MPH The venerable 216 lasted until 1952, but the 235 became available in 1950 on automatic transmission (powerglide) cars and remained the standard engine untill 1962, when the new 194 6 came out in the Chevy 2,m along with Chevy's first 4 cyl since 1928, the 153 "Deuce" The early 235 (up to 1953) was still a semi-pressure splash lubed engine. It became a full pressure engine in 1953.Automatic tranny cars got hydraulic lifters , and in 1956 all 235 engines got them. In Canada the enlarged "stove bolt" 261 was used in some trucks and Canadian built Pontiacs.
The 235 was the first Chevy with full pressure oiling. It was built under licence by Toyota from 1955 to 1974 as the "F" engine used in the Land Cruiser. Vauxhaul/Bedford also used a smaller 168 cu inch "stove bolt" design in some vehicles, but also had a smaller 138 cu inch 6.(1950s Velox and Cresta?)
I owned a 1928 and a 1935 Chevy and still have some old manuals around.
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 21:03:21 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What you said in many words, I said in few. The engine in 1938 was the same 216 in my 1941 and 1946 pickup trucks with what was commonly called "a splash oil system". I also correctly stated that the 235 was a later engine with an oil pump (full pressure oiling system)
I said that after you incorrectly said that the same 235 was in use from 1938 to 1962. It clearly was not.
Google can't save you.
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On Mar 13, 6:04am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Esoterica: This bit my BIL. You could not put a 37 engine into an earlier chev without changing the motor mounts. The 37 was shorter. I knew this as my dad had to do the conversion when he changed the motor on his 34 1 1/2 truck. My BIL tried it on a ?36? PU back in the 70s
Harry K
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 10:03:21 -0800 (PST), Harry K

"stove bolt", and I'm told the cast iron wonder would interchange with the pre-1929 4 cyl. (the 1928 hood was long enough to take the six as the 1929 engine was originally slated for the '28)
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 09:04:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Except the castr iron wonder and the early stovebolt ALSO had an oil pump. (as did the earlier 4 cyl Chevies)
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 15:26:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Completely irrelevant
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 07:34:47 -0800 (PST), Harry K
in

And without a clutch it is still very easy to knock a standard transmission into neutral.
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Jack wrote:

Well, it can on MY car. I routinely shift into neutral many times a day, sometimes at speeds over 50 MPH!
'Course I have a manual, 5-speed, transmission...
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HeyBub wrote:

I do it all the time on my 2000 chevy 3500 van, with an automatic transmission and my 2002 Saturn SL2, also automatic. There are a couple mile long declines I drive on and often take it out of gear and coast.
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Tony wrote:

My '94 Caravan with an electronically controlled automatic does the same.
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