Rubble foundation: patch/repair

Hi everybody,
We have an 80-year-old house in Northern Wisconsin. It has what I believe is called a "rubble foundation," essentially stones cut into a size and shape similar to concrete blocks, piled up, with mortar between them.
The mortar has deteriorated on about 1/4 of the foundation, to the point where it's easily chipped off and critters (mice and chipmunks) are finding their way into the house. Other than that, the basement and the foundation are in great shape, no settling or cracking or anything. Just this loose mortar and the critters.
Is patching/repointing/whatever-it's-called something a handyman can do on a weekend day? What do I use to patch it? Any advice or caveats?
thanks in advance for your help!
:-) Tommy
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Sounds like Ashlar: Any squared building stone. Coursed Ashlar if the horizontal joints are level. Broken Ashlar if the horizontal joints are "broken". Check the BIA web site Tech Notes for repointing info. That's the Brick Industry Association, but the info should still work for you. Pay attention to the tech notes, and you should be able to do it. Time to completion depends on size of job and your speed. TB My folks lived in Menomonie and Cable
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I'm told that it's called "pointing" when you do it to a brick chimney, and "tucking" when you do it to a stone foundation.
In any case, it's tedious and time consuming, but not difficult. Definately DIY material, but plan to spend more than one weekend on it. There is a special tool for it called a grout bag.. http://www.constructioncomplete.com/GroutBags/MTLIncBT2310.html
Clean out any loose or weak mortar and dirt with a big-ass nail/spike before squirting in the new.
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You will need to repair it in some way. Sometimes you can pour an "outer wall that tapers into the new one, but I would suggest repouring or cinder block to rebuild the wall. Like the Bible says, don't build your house on sinking sand, which is what your morter is becoming. This is coming from experience from our old farmhouse. Good luvk in your repair.
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