Rubber Vs Plastic/Vinyl Garden Hoses ?


Hello,
It seems that the normal plastic/vinyl garden hoses get made cheaper and cheaper each year. Usually, in years past, it was at the fittings that started to leak on mine first. The ones I bought this year actually split and "blew out" along the length. Two of them ! At least there is good "quality-control," I guess.
So, I'm thinking of perhaps trying one of the rubber type of garden hoses.
What are the pros and cons of vinyl/plastic vs. rubber garden hoses ?
Thoughts on would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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Try focusing on the number of plies, like a tire. the more plies the longer lastsing and more kink free your hose will be.
I use vinyl because it's easier to handle but I only buy reinforced vinyl. Real rubber garden hose can get heavy and cumbersome.
my $.02
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The Henchman wrote:

That is for sure. I bought a couple of the 'commercial grade' 100 foot rubber ones at Sam's because the price was cheap, and they had machined brass fittings, with the strain relief spring on the upstream end. They have held up well, although the nozzles tend to fuse in place if I don't grease them in the spring. But the hoses weigh a frigging ton, and are a major pain to drain and put away in the fall- once the weather gets a little chilly, they take a roll set like service drop cable. Last year, I ended up storing them coiled inside a spare trash can, because I could not get them to coil neatly enough to store loose.
I'll probably sell them with the house, if they haven't failed by then, and next house will have the hoses that look like a kitchen sink squirter hose with the braiding. Not as durable, but a lot easier to handle.
--
aem sends...


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aemeijers wrote:

A good hose reel makes rolling good hoses up really easy. That saves lots of time.
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Bob wrote:

Have you been buying the lifetime-warranted hoses? Vinyl varies in quality, and the no-name hoses start cracking if left in sunlight for a few years, while Goodyear and Sears Craftsman vinyl hoses hold up fine.
Black rubber is heavy and sheds black powder like crazy, but it's kink resistant, lasts forever in the sun (EPDM rubber, the same kind used for rubber roofs), and I've never been able to damage it by dragging it hard against highly resistant masonry.
Then t here's rubberized vinyl, which seems to give all the advantages of rubber but doesn't shed messy powder.
Get a hose made with machined brass fittings because stamped fittings can be bent (makes hose crimps and metal-metal crimps leak), and steel fittings eventually develop pinholes.
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In my experience, the black rubber Goodyear hoses last ten to one over the cheaper others. Little by little, I'm getting all rubber hoses, as they are spendy. But they are nice when you go to string one out, or join a couple together for a long run, and there's no leaks, and no kinks, and no damaged flimsy ends.
You get what you pay for, and the rubber ones are worth it, imho.
Steve
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wrote:

I've had a black GY water hose for 9 yrs now that always lies in the sun.
There in no powder coming off of it. Best water hose that I've ever owned.
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wrote:

I've had a black GY water hose for 9 yrs now that always lies in the sun.
There in no powder coming off of it. Best water hose that I've ever owned.
reply: I second the statement that GY is the best I've ever had.
Steve
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On 8/16/2010 7:31 PM, Bob wrote:

I run both. Rubber for most of the way, and vinyl for the bit at the end.
Rubber is not as flexible, heavier and gets much hotter in the sun. On the other hand, it won't kink and should last a very long time.
If you buy vinyl, get the best you can afford. Bargain hoses are no bargain.

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Sears Craftsman garden hoses used to be covered under warranty just like hand tools. If that still applies, it is the best bargain around. FWIW, I hang my heavy duty rubber hoses on plastic hangers mounted 5 feet up on the wall. That gives you large loops to deal with and a 50' hose can be put away quickly. Never did understand why people want to get an honest appliance like a hose tucked out of sight in a funky plastic box that IMO looks really pathetic. But whatever floats your boat...
Joe
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wrote:

Sears Craftsman garden hoses used to be covered under warranty just like hand tools. If that still applies, it is the best bargain around. FWIW, I hang my heavy duty rubber hoses on plastic hangers mounted 5 feet up on the wall. That gives you large loops to deal with and a 50' hose can be put away quickly. Never did understand why people want to get an honest appliance like a hose tucked out of sight in a funky plastic box that IMO looks really pathetic. But whatever floats your boat...
Joe
= Wow. You have strong feelings about hose reels. How do you feel about abortion?
Just kidding. I think it has some to do with location. I think your idea is pretty good but for my house I'd have to pull the hose over to the side of the house then hang it on the hanger and it's real easy to have a reel situated where I can easily roll it up. Also, having a hose hanging off the side of your house can look tacky if it's in plain view.
I didn't know I had such strong feeling lingering inside me about hose reels!
<g> Jim
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wrote:

I personally find reels to be a real pain in the ass. You have to spend a lot to get a good one, although the ones recommended here are a combination of reel, and wheel where one can load the hose on to the wheel from the side, like an old car rim. That is what I use is old car rims. They allow you to store the hose with big loops so that it doesn't compress the hose as much, making it necessary to unreel all the hose to get water through it. The diameter of the loops is also much greater, and the hose does not deform into a tight spiral. Also, most of the reels have a small capacity, and when that is reached, they become hopelessly tangled in there when the tension is released and it uncoils like a spring in there. It is difficult to put 100' of hose on most mechanical reels, although some of the spendier ones you can.
And last, what about in the winter when it freezes? It is easier to drain a hose and put it on a spare wheel holder with no water in it than to get all of the water out of a hose that is on a reel.
Plus, in my town, I can get those real fancy rims that people hit the curbs with. They're ruined, but you can't see it from the street, and there's something to be said for having a Porsche or Lamborghini or Mercedes hose holder. I've had people ask me where I got them, and if I'd build them one. I say sure, and for a $5 post and a free rim, I get $25. They have to concrete it into a hole.
And I don't think they look any tackier than a mechanical hose reel. I don't get either based on looks.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

I've got 3 plastic hose reels with more than 100 feet of hose. One has 125 feet of 3/4" hose. The only real issue with them is the hose tends to flex the end of the reel out till it binds against the reel support if you don't roll it carefully, making the hose wrap back over itself befor it applies pressure against the ends of the reel.

Just stretch the hose out downhill from the reel, disconnect the input connection from the spigot, and reel it in slowly. All the water runs out the far end as you reel it in.

That's certainly a good idea.
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