"Rough" tile and baseboard

My wife and I both like the look of "rough" tile i.e. not ceramic, more natural looking tile. I am curious whether or not it is a good choice for us. We are installing a drop in tub. The tub will be sitting on this tile surface. I assume we will be able to cock the gaps to make it "mate" up nice. However, what do you do with baseboards? It seems to me that there will be gaps between the bottom of the baseboard and the tile.
Thank you, Chris
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 2, 7:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do you ever sit on the edge of the tub? I sure wouldn't want to sit on a rough surface. Lots of grout needed for the basebaord
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

You don't use baseboard. You get bullnose tile in the same color and finish, and go a few inches up the wall with that. Just another grout joint. Not much point in having a tile floor in the bath if you can't wet-mop in there. If there is no bullnose in that color, you use cut half-tiles, and top them with a band of suitable hardwood with a waterproof finish.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think you would do better to install tub first ant then tile to it.
Same thing with baseboards...put down tile leaving enough of a gap between wall and tile edge to insert baseboard then grout remaining gap. Or, if you're using something like Saltillo tile, just use cut pieces for the baseboards (still laying field tiles with the gap). ALL my baseboards are Saltillo tile...one full tile cut in thirds, one long edge beveled and the bevel rounded over by sanding.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

We have porcellain tile with a natural stone color and texture. The surface is irregular, but not what I would call "rough". I caulked around the baseboards with caulk close in color to that of the tile. Gotta be careful to tape the tile so caulk doesn't ooze into the grout joints. Baseboard and tile are both light taupe color. Can always use clear, but it is glossy which can make it noticeable.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't mean to be rude but if you don't know the difference between "cock" and the proper word "caulk" you need to leave this job to a professional.
If you want baseboard instead of a bullnose tile as someone recommended as an alternative that's your preference. The way to get baseboard to fit tightly along and entire uneven surface is to scribe it and cut along the line. If you don't know how to do that you need to leave that job to a professional.
G.S.
On Sat, 2 May 2009 05:50:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you building? Remodeling? If remodeling, what is in the room that you plant to keep? More natural tile....unglazed? I would recommend stopping at a good tile store to see what is available, compare characteristics. By "not ceramic", do you mean "not shiny"? Plastic? Terra cotta? Better idea of what you want would help.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.