Rough price- electrical

As we get further into repairs after renters, looking for very *general* rate info on some items. We know the rates vary but if anyone can tell us what they paid (and area you generally live in) we'd appreciate it. If you happen to be in Norfolk area, thats us.
- Outets, 2 prong (some of house is 3 prng with new GFCI switches). Replace with 3 prong. Looking at price for 3-5 of them, then a second idea if we want to do 27 of them.
- Light switch, pulled from wall, needs new box and mounting. Wall not severely damaged but old bolt holes stripped
- Light switch with short in kitchen over sink (jiggle it and it comes on but only when 50% of the way between on and off (we have it off and do not touch it) (caused by stupid renters putting 100W bulb in a 60W unit we think). Can get new light for the spot easy and have it there for replacement if needed.
- replace 2 ceiling fan/lights with new units (ceiling joist/box is fine and stable).
- completely replace and rewire 3 outlets in enclosed porch, walls will be down and inulation and drywall installed after the electrical is done. Looking at the bare studs and outer wall at the time of the work. These were already wired but the water damage was signficant.
I know some of you can easily do this yourselves, but while my husband and I are pretty handy (and quite handy with some things), electrical isnt something we are comfortable with. Wed rather pay and *know* it was done right and safely as well as to code.
Replies appreciated! Carol.
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The most accurate answer will be obtained by having 3 - 4 contractors come over and look at the actual job - but I suspect you knew that already.
Things like "Wall not severely damaged but old bolt holes stripped" and "water damage was signficant" could impact the cost significantly, so it's hard for anyone to give you a decent estimate over the web. We also can't tell what else will need to be done if there are code issues that show up as the work is being performed.
BTW - using a 100 watt bulb in a 60 watt fixture may be a fire hazard, but it will not cause a short in the switch.
re: some of house is 3 prng with new GFCI switches
What's a GFCI switch? ;-)
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wrote:

Yes and waiting to be called.

True, presume no other code issues in the house other than some has not been updated from 2 prong to 3 prong. I have a huge number of outlets (origional owner added 19 in the back porch alone, all but 2 of those are 2 prong). I recall paying quite a bit to put in a proper ground in an area not wired for it (kitchen). The fellow was amused as some of the house is and some isnt (porch I think and garage, possibly one of the 3 bedrooms).
Presume any area not wired for 3 prong, will stay that way if safe. Not asking for miracle costs of adding that if it is needed as they have to see the place to estimate for that.
On the water damage, ignore as by the time the electrician sees that part, it's basically like wiring a new room with studs exposed and no drywall yet put up. Run lines and put in the boxes.

Not sure what caused it. Just know how it acts. I guess you are telling me it's the light fixture then?

Perhaps I used the wrong term? The type you want in kitchens and bathrooms. They have a sort of little breaker built in thats red and pops out. As said, Don and I are not electically savvy. Good at many things but this isnt one of them.
Carol
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No, if the power comes on and off when you wiggle the switch, I'm guessing it's the switch. All a switch does is complete the path of the hot wire from the source to the fixture by means of a mechanical contact inside the switch. I'd say it just went bad due to mechanical failure. The wrong size bulb in the fixture can't cause the switch to act like this.
Shut off the breaker to that circuit, remove the screws that hold the switch plate on, remove the switch by loosening the 2 screws that hold it in the box, loosen the 2 screws that hold the wires on and reverse these instructions to install the new switch. Fixing this may empower you (no pun intended) to replace the outlets and save some money.
BTW..maybe it's just a loose wire on the switch and you'll just have to to tighten it up.

They're GFCI outlets (or receptacles) not switches. I assumed it was just a typo since you started the paragraph with the word "outlets", which was correct..
Good luck!
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Here is what I would do. First, ask around among friends and family. You might locate someone who can safely do the work before you go spend more. A lot of people who work in the trades do side jobs for CA$H. If not, I would check with some of the smaller companies, as they do the smaller things like this.
Steve
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I would replace ALL the 2 prong outlets, they can cause a terrible hassle at home resale time.
Do you have knob and tube wiring?
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Yes. Over time we'd like to do that but the 19 in the back porch arent hurting anything and there is a GFCI outlet out there too.

Not sure what that is but house was built in 1962. Been upgraded piecemeal since then. Breaker box is only 10 years old. I've never had a breaker trip either if that helps understand the overall setup. If I counted right, its a 360amp box with about 160 of it not even used (3 unsed 30amps plus some 20's and 15's.)
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re -- If I counted right, its a 360amp box with about 160 of it not even used
You didn't count right. :-)
The amperage rating of the box is not determined by adding up the amperage rating of each individual breaker. Each breaker merely tells you what that breaker can handle before it will trip. Long before you get even close to the total amperage for each circuit, you will probably overload the main breaker.
Look at the large breaker at the top of the breaker panel. The rating of that single breaker should be the overall rating of your service. Could be 60, 100, 150 or 200 or something like that.
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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

Grin, see why we prefer to get an electrician? I'm learning though and that is good!

Ok. We arent useing most of it. I found a tag area. It says 3 wire, 340 amp max? (It's slightly scuffed there, looks like 340?). Could it be I have 200 amp service and a box abe to carry more but not doing so? Do the boxes come in 340 amp types? If it helps, I know the old box was 100amp and the origional owner had it removed and put ths one in due to power tools and such.
I see in another thread someone wondering if they should upgrade from 100amp to 200amp whle they are at it fixing up a basement. Seems they needed a 'sub box' insead as they are largely gas appliances. I'm gas stove, heat (with electric needed for the blower) and gas hotwater I know my electric bills are lower than most in my area. I know when we have had electrical work, the electricans smile at the box and say my wiring is good but not all yet upgraded. It's an ongoing project.
.

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Cshenk wrote: ...

There's the answer that you seem to have ignored. Almost certainly the main breaker will be sized consistently w/ the service. In any event, it defines it because that's the point at which total load will trip it (assuming you could reach that actual load/usage w/o tripping individual circuit breakers and also, of course, the difference between nominal and actual absolute trip points, etc., ...)
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"dpb" wrote in message .

Thanks but the only thing on the big breaker is 'on/off' and a little GE label.
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Cshenk wrote:

I has to have a rating...
--
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I think you counted wrong. :-)
You can't determine the size of the service by adding up the ratings of the individual breakers. The ratings on the breakers merely denote what that breaker can handle before it will trip. Long before you reach the capacity of all the breakers in the box, you will probably trip the main breaker.
Look at the rating on the main breaker - the big one at the top of the panel. It should read something like 60, 100, 150, or 200. If things are as they should be, then that is the amperage of the service entering the house.
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"SteveB" wrote .

Snip, several small jobs)

I have very few friends here just now because we just moved back from Sasebo Japan, but I am going to catch my neighbor who does roofing and such and ask if he has a friend who'd like some extra money (cash) for the various small jobs. xxcarol
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