Rough-In After Concrete Poured

Before I call in a plumber for quotes, could someone give me an idea of how much a PIA it will be to install toilet and sink drains once concrete floor has been poured (and hardened)? It's about a six foot run to existing pipes.
Thanks, Mark J
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It should be done before the concrete. How do you expect to tie in the drain under solid concrete? I'd consider an ejector toilet rather that take out the concrete.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Personally, for a 6 foot run, I'd probably open the concrete, and avoid the ejector pump setup that has a lot more maintenance/reliability issues over the life of the house. And I'd do it sooner, rather than later. If the concrete is only a few days old, it's still not as hard as concrete that has had a month to cure.
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On 11 Mar 2006 04:08:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

When I was on the standard tour of the Panama Canal, the guide talked about this, how the locks were harder every year. By 1970 or earlier, if a big ship ran into the lock wall, it was the ship that got damaged.(low budget trip, guys. 150 dollars airfare plus 3 dollars a day.)
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A few hours work breaking up a channel through the concrete and patching it

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harbor freight has nice jackhamers at reasonable price. pumps just cause troubles over the long haul
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snipped-for-privacy@mailhost.com says...

A six foot run isn't bad, We've done that before. A lot depends on how deep the waste line is at that point. Use a diamond blade in a circular saw to score the concrete, then break it out with a hammer, and dig as required. Making the connection in the drain will require a large enough hole to get in there and work, you have to cut out the existing line and put in a Y using rubber connectors. Run the new line, have it inspected (this sounds like new construction) then pour the new concrete. A half day's work for an experienced plumber, then inspection and pouring the next day.
Dennis
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wrote:

4" concrete. That is far from uncommon. They will cut both sides and the strip will break out very easy
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