Rotten T-111 exterior paneling


Rotten T-111 exterior paneling
Hi guys:
I have a house in Austin TX with old exterior paneling (1980's). Most of it I can repair with bondo except an area near the backdoor underneath and awning.
Do you guys have any suggestions on how I could go about repairing this area short of taking all the siding off and starting new?
http://www.safaricabs.com/t111rot.jpg
Here is another picture of the conduit that gets in the way and the window ledge.
http://www.safaricabs.com/t111rot (2).jpg
I'd like to fix it as cheap as possible. The other side was repaired by someone else like this:
http://www.safaricabs.com/t111fixed.jpg
This would be fine but I don't know exactly how they removed the old siding and replaced it with the new.
Thanks
Jim.
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jthread wrote:

First of all, that is Reverse board and batten, not T-111. Next, you could replace just a section of the panel that is damaged. Cut it at the edge of the groove and just replace the section that is damaged. Use Z flashing at the horizontal junction of the old and new.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Thanks.
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if you screw up a couple of times till it looks right. The previous patch work looks like they just sawed it off with a skilsaw, stuck some Z-flashing up under the cut end, and scabbed in new panels. Shame on them for not lining up the kerfs. Yes, the surface outlets and conduit will be a pain, but if you undo the clamps and tug a bit, they will probably flex enough to slide new wood behind them. You will have to pull the door trim, and probably that outlet because of the ears. The rot occured because the bottom edge probably wasn't sealed, and was jammed right against the concrete foundation lip, rather than hanging over it Along with patching the siding, you also wanna poke at the sill plate and joist ends to make sure they didn't pick up any rot. Or is it a slab house? In that case, they F'd up by not running a course of block to set the walls on. Walls should NEVER sit right on the slab. I see no evidence of any flashing under the bottom of the siding.
If the entire house has the siding jammed right down on the concrete like that, as soon as you patch one spot, another will fail. Entire house needs the bottom foot of siding cut off, proper flashing added, and then patch back with a strip of hardiplank or something. That may or may not be cheaper than a complete residing job, since piecing in requires better carpenter skills than tearing off and replacing. Don't just side over it all- buried rot keeps rotting.
aem sends....
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Thanks for the advice.
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