Rotten egg hot water - success ever? anybody?

Rotten egg odor in hot water is a common concern here.
The most common fix recommended is to change the sacrificial anode for a different material. The rationale for doing so is less than detailed, but some of the sources are official or semiofficial.
The second most common fix recommended is to sterilize the water heater and/or parts of the system with bleach.
The anode providers usually include a caveat that if any of the old rod falls off the problem will remain. The bleach fans say you'll probably have to repeat after a few months.
What I want to know is did anyone try either one and succeed? (and I mean the odor go away, not just I bought an expensive anode/bleachinjector/carbon filter and it's a little better)
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wrote:

different material. The rationale for doing so is less than detailed, but some of the sources are official or semiofficial.

off the problem will remain. The bleach fans say you'll probably have to repeat after a few months.

odor go away, not just I bought an expensive anode/bleachinjector/carbon filter and it's a little better) The only way we've been able to get rid of the stink at a friend's cottage is to bleach and then use lots of water. Stink is in both hot and cold if the water system is left to sit. Running water every day after bleaching the water is pretty good. Leave it sit for a month and the stink is back.
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wrote:

different material. The rationale for doing so is less than detailed, but some of the sources are official or semiofficial.

off the problem will remain. The bleach fans say you'll probably have to repeat after a few months.

odor go away, not just I bought an expensive anode/bleachinjector/carbon filter and it's a little better)
We had the problem with two water heaters at work. We replaced the anodes in both and problem has been gone for well over a year now. The old anodes were really nasty looking too.
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I have to process the rv heater all the time. I don't leave it on. Normal treated tap water only has to be set above 120 degrees to keep bacteria from multiplying. 140 degrees kills them. I do flushing and chlorine treatment. It's easy to pour chlorine into feed hose to trailer. I dont anticipate keeping it working, as it's old and rusting around outside parts. A new tank should have the aluminum rod. Since I have well water, the water has to be kept more like 130 degrees. Since the tank is small, there is a tendency to want to keep it hot for reserve.
Greg
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