Rotted out 4" copper waste line

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I agree. And, to answer the question about connecting the copper to PVC, Fernco-type fittings such as these are the easiest option: http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/flexible-couplings .
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Because I wanted a entire copper line replaced I had a plumber do it. I was tired of piecing it every few years.
all replaced with PVC 700 bucks.
got 160 for copper scrap:) had line replaced from attic to basement it was a nasty job even for the plumber. drains much better, lines have better fall
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A couple of Ferncos and some glued together PVC and you should be able to do this in a couple hours. As a bonus you'll probably make a few bucks.
I scrapped some copper wire last week and got $1.10 a pound unstripped. For clean copper you'll get more.
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vinyl electric tape will work too
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wrote:

If you are in the U.S. and use American currency, it will cost somewhere between $1.00 and $20,000. It depends on what is needed, the economy, the cost of parts, the amount of labor, taxes, and how much the plumber needs to buy his wife a diamond ring and get himself a new cadillac. If there's any asbestos nearby, double those figures.
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I was able to make a good quick TEMPORARY repair to my 3 inch copper waste line from the toilet lead bend using a small piece or rubber cut from an ol d tire inner tube and two stainless steel hose clamps.
In my case, I had a drip from the bottom of the copper pipe adjacent to the toilet lead bend solder joint. I scraped it lightly with a screwdriver to reveal what appeared to be a tiny slot at the bottom of the pipe (leaked a lot more afterward). Naturally, the pipe was installed with NO pitch to a dequately empty the pipe after each use. I don't yet know how far along th e pipe additional corrosion exists, if any, but I am determined to wait unt il next spring before effecting a permanent repair.
Another good tip for working with old waste lines: Don't bite your fingern ails.
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