Rotary phase converter: local ground or all the way to the panel?

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:-) I get the message. I won't cheap out. My credit card is feeling the strain though.
Still looking around for some #2 or bigger. I've got a lead on some #4 wire.
My plan, after all the advice is to put a single phase 100A subpanel in the garage. That subpanel will have a breaker for the RPC.
Main Panel | | #2 wire, 70+ feet run | 1ph Sub-panel | | 60A 2 pole breaker, #2 wire, 10 foot max run | RPC | | #2 wire, 10 foot max run | 3ph Panel (3ph/pole breakers for machines)
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 00:59:59 -0800 (PST), rpseguin

As has been mentioned, you don't need a full size ground. You should check the code, but my recollection is that a #10 is a suitable grounding conductor for a 60A circuit.
--
Ned Simmons

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If you don't need to go underground buy aluminum mud cable, this will easily be the cheapest solution. Aluminum got a bad name because they tried to use it in small sizes in residential, with the wrong devices, along with labor that was clueless about proper techniques. We made a lot of money fixing jobs done wrong in aluminum, and I have never seen a properly done aluminum job fail.
Gary H. Lucas
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I seem to remember using some sort of yellow paste where it was joined to other metals to prevent corrosion - Unial?
--
Stuart Winsor

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As for my sub-panel and 3 phase panel things, I've just ordered a 500' spool of #1 aluminum wire. It is _WAY_ less expensive than copper. I will be certain to read up and make certain that I bond everything correctly, use anti-corrosion goo and make certain all connections are torqued down properly. The RPC and all of the machine loads will be made using some copper THHN that I already have.
I've acquired a Cutler Hammer 3BR1224L125 125 amp 3 phase circuit breaker load center panel and now I need to find some CH BR3xx plug/ stab-in breakers. 3 pole breakers are pricey new! Anybody have some Cutler Hammer compatible breakers like these: BR360 BR350 BR340 BR330 BR320 BR315 BR310
Thanks!
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<snip>

Suggest try Ebay...
--




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wrote:

Here's how to do the aluminum connections. First, do NOT nick the strands when stripping the insulation! The nicked strands break right off. Second, wire brush the bare wire with a stainless wirebrush. Aluminum oxide, unlike copper oxide is one of the best insulators known. Third, use an antioxidant compound, Penetrox is the brand we used to use. It is conductive, so don't get it on the insulation. Fourth, tighten the setscrews firmly. Fifth, and VERY important, tighten the setscrews again the next day. Aluminum creeps, and they will often be loose by the next day. Pretty stable after that, but checking once a year or so is just smart. Finally, aluminum connections come loose if they are overloaded, because the aluminum expands a lot and squeezes out like toothpaste. So don't be a cheap ass and overload it, use the right size.
Gary H. Lucas
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