Rope knot making a loop.

When I was a kid, my dad would make a "loop" in the end of our ropes. This loop would be a handle. The diameter of the loop would typically be 6 or 8 inches. He would "weave" the cut end of the rope back into itself at the beginning of the loop. When he was done, other than the thickness of the rope being larger, you couldn't tell where the cut ends had been woven in. I've tried googling for an answer, but I get so many hits, I can't wade through them all. Any one understand what I'm describing and do you have a name for it, and maybe an explanation on how to do it? Thanks. Perry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perry Templeton wrote:

A search for "eye splice" should get you lots of relevant methods, many with animations to make the method clearer. Takes a little practice to get it to look good, but you can usually end up with something servicable after the first one or two tries...
Hope that helps, --Glenn Lyford
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need to search for and "eye splice". The instructions vary, depending on the type of rope and the type of eye you want. For something simpler, you should use a bowline knot.
--
Murray Peterson
Email: snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gotta tell you, I did a double take...my dad's name was Murray...when I first looked and saw replies, and then saw the name, I thought fer sure he had answered me himself (and then I saw the last name) Thanks for the clue as to what to call it. Perry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 21:17:55 -0500, "Perry Templeton"

Get your hands on a 1950's thru 60's Buy Scout manual. Knots galore.... Maybe the new BSA manuals have it too, but doubtfully. These days they are probably all computer logic and such. Kids these days dont learn anything useful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What you are describing is called an "eye splice". It isn't a knot. There are also long splices and short splices used to join two ropes. A long splice will pass over a sheave (pulley) as smoothly as uncut rope. A short splice that does not have to fit a pulley will work as well and does not use up as much rope. A back splice is used to terminate the cut end of a rope to prevent unravelling. These methods work for wire rope as well as hemp rope woven from 3 strands of material. Splices are much stronger than knots since they do not create stress points where one rope binds against the other within the knot. There are several web sites that provide an animated picture showing the weaving which produces an eye splice. I recommend that you start with a short piece of used, larger rope to practice since new rope will be still very tightly woven and more difficult to open the strands to weave in the ends. A small smooth spike such as a plastic writing pen may be used to open the standing part of the rope as well.
On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 00:22:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@ISP.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Around boats and in marine use, this would be called an "eye splice" Try a book on seamanship.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.
Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - lwasserm(@)charm(.)net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You won't find splices in the BSA Handbook but there a fair number of basic knots. Much of the campcraft has been moved into the Fieldbook and some of the merit badge booklets. But that doesn't mean that scouts don't learn the fundamentals. Our troop does a fair amount of backpacking and hiking and usually have a least one campout per year devoted to Pioneering where they learn/practice lashings, splicing and more advanced knots.
There are lots of different approaches to running a scout troop. Your comments may apply to some, but not all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check these... be sure to look through the links included at the end of each article.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rope_splicing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knot
Erik
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perry Templeton wrote:

I dunk the rope ends in a can of paint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 21:17:55 -0500, Perry Templeton wrote:

Whip a small section on main bite where you want to stop the line from untwisting. Whip the end of each strand before starting braid. This will help to keep it neat until you gain more experiance.
http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg
This site has step by step instructions for splicing an eye. Numbered steps under animation make it easier to understand.
http://www.animatedknots.com/splice/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com
When finished splicing the eye roll the braided part on the floor with your foot to smooth the braided section.
This gets easier and more neat in appearance with practice. Once the three strands are started correctly you simply put each strand over one and under the next as it is braided together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perry Templeton wrote:

Keep in mind that many types of rope today simply aren't splicable. Unless you have an overriding reason to splice, it's much faster and easier to use a good knot.
For examples: http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/knotindex.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.animatedknots.com/splice/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.