Root cause insight into the common BMW blower motor resistor failures

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Bosch has done the nichrome insert power resistor for many years; I know that they used them in the turn signal flasher in the late seventies when they first went electronic. They aren't really very good resistors but they are very cheap. --scott
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

THey make power resistors in T0-220 style cases, for heat sink mounting however, I doubt those are that.
Jamie
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Bimmer Owner wrote:

line with the emitters where they joint.
Most likely thermo stress cracks due to the potting restraint.
Jamie
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On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 19:52:26 -0500, Jamie wrote:

Other people have suggested this also.
Some say the potting is what is causing the stress cracks.
Re-insert without potting, is the "said to be" solution.
One question: If the FSU works without potting, what was the purpose of the potting?
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I'm still trying to figure out if there was only one or two:

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Bimmer Owner wrote:

Two.
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Bimmer Owner wrote:

I was never crazy about that style of heatsink.
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These are kind of sloppy jobs. But it's clear there are two TO-3 devices there which have been removed in all of those photos.

Well, has anyone got docs on that mystery IC there? It's from Elmos Semiconductor, but it's not a standard Elmos part number on it, so it's almost certainly a custom, since it doesn't look like anything in their standard book. --scott
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On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 15:16:46 -0400, Scott Dorsey wrote:

I don't know what a "TO-3" device is, but nobody removed anything in those photos other than the goop that covered the circuit board.

Focusing just on that Elmos Semiconductor AG IC from this thread: http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t09399 It looks like the PN is ELMOS, 10901D, 667A 1302A
It might be a generic or a special chip; I can't find it on the web: http://www.elmos.com/produkte/automotive/motor-control/dc-motor-ics.html
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All the standard Elmos part numbers begin with an E.
My guess is that the number on the chip is 10901D and that the other two numbers are date and batch codes. --scott
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On Mar 21, 10:25 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

If you google for 10901D it comes back with hits to Chinese chip brokers that show it as an Elmos 16 pin surface mount chip. Which is consistent with what's in the picture of the failed module, it has 16 pins. But I could not find any data sheet on the part either.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 05:20:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found the same. The chip is listed here: http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/10901D
But there is no datasheet there.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 05:20:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found a Russian language description of it here: http://tinyurl.com/crg2sms http://kazus.ru/schematics/electrical-engineering/search/go/?text=%D0%C5%C3%D3%CB%DF%D2%CE%D0%20ELMOS%2010901D&nohistory=1&h=1
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 12:31:09 +0000, Bimmer Owner wrote:

Here is a google translation
REGULATOR ELMOS 10901D Car Voltage Regulator Category: Car Source: Radioland country Electronics Temperature controller cabin air KAMAZ
Source: Plans radiokonstruktsy Simple Temperature compensated voltage regulator. Controller together with thyristor-transistor electronic ignition unit with a long spark, ensuring the rapid start-ups at various operating conditions, allowed to increase battery life of up to nine years.
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Regulator for automotive windshield
Source: MASTER KIT The controller measures the wiper-this control is designed to use regular mode switch blades and is contactless.
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Temperature compensated voltage regulator device in some ways superior designs. The controller can be used as a universal device is suitable not only for mounting on any car, but everywhere, where the generator rotor speed is variable (eg, wind power). Choose the appropriate control elements, it can be easily adapted to work with any voltage (up to 400V) and excitation current (tens of amperes).
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator 2012.3702, 22.3702, 221.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator 201.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage Regulator 13.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator RR132A, 1112.3702
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 12:31:09 +0000, Bimmer Owner wrote:

Googling for the Russian text, I find they appear to have the same problem with the same FSU over here: http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/viewtopic.php?p 38466#8838466
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I have tried to repair the FSU for BMW e46 by replacing the two MOSFET tran sistors with equivalent: IRF3205 (and even two more powerful) but it seems they cannot do the job due to other electronic component which i cannot fig ure out. Even though there is a change on G -gate the transistor won't chan ge the flow ..there must be something on the Base or Collector ... I'm stun ned cause i tried repairing two of them
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On Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:37:33 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

s they cannot do the job due to other electronic component which i cannot f igure out. Even though there is a change on G -gate the transistor won't ch ange the flow ..there must be something on the Base or Collector ... I'm st unned cause i tried repairing two of them
Root cause is BMW designed/specd a piece of crap and doesn't give a damn about resolving it, even thouh it's been an obvious problem for a decade, guys like you have bitched about it and their service people obviously know about it.
They've achieved some other marvels of engineering, like putting electronics inside the aux fan that sits in front of the hot radiator, to vary the fan speed. Simple on/off fan wasn't good enough. So, they put electronics in an environment where it gets 130F, salt, water, God knows what. Of course they fail. And you can't even diagnose it because no one knows what kind of signal they send it to turn it on, off, fast, slow, etc. BMW can, with their magic computer that they can hook up to turn it on and off. So, every 2 years you buy a new one for $275 aftermarket price, plus labor. Go to BMW and get the OEM part, it's $750 by the time you're done and they still fail.
Another favorite is how they manage to use a vast assortment of cable connectors that even upon careful examination, you can't figure out how they come apart. And that's assuming you can see it well, right in front of you.
I've had basic American cars that went 100K+ miles with no CV boot joint failures. A friend just got rid of a Honda CRV with 200K+ miles and no CV boot failures. Friend has an X5 and it went through 2 of them in less than 75K miles. At 140K, they're shot again. The rubber boot on the intake manifold also failed at 75K. Obviously their rubber boot products are crap, but they don't care.
Or how about their window system in the X5, where they use crappy cables to hold the windows up? I've seen those fail with the car sitting in the driveway. Cable snaps, window falls down and smashes to bits. Not on just one window, I saw it happen on two different ones in a friends car.
But, you're already planning on buying your next $75K BMW wonder car, right?
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On 11/14/2013 11:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

equivalent: IRF3205 (and even two more powerful) but it seems they cannot do the job due to other electronic component which i cannot figure out. Even though there is a change on G -gate the transistor won't change the flow ..there must be something on the Base or Collector ... I'm stunned cause i tried repairing two of them

Do you get many on topic comments on a home repair list?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hi, Checked/set proper bias voltage for the replacement MOSFET? If you don't know how or can't do it they won't work properly for sure.

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Hi i just bought an fsu from behr for my 2002 e46 and i opened it . Inside was only one transistor 2n0605 from infineon and an elmos 10901d.The 2n0605 is 80 amps 55v mos.I am now working to figure out the exact schematics
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