Room Ventilation


This room that I am working on right now will be used for recording and will be about as soundprooof as I can get it without going too overboard cost wise. So, to me, that means that it is going to be very air tight too.
The thing about his house is that there are no furnace air returns in the whole upstairs. So I only have one heat vent in this room and no air return.
I don't need the vent for heat but will need to use the air conditioner in the summer. I can just open the door and let the room cool down and then not need the air conditioner much for a while when I close the door even tho the Air will still be on. I can also turn on the fan in the winter even tho I will be using a space heater (probably a radiator type because they are quiet) to heat up the room.
So the question is will the furnace fan blow much air into an airtight room that has no air return or at least an opening for the air that is already in the room to go to? If I just open the door for a while every half hour or hour or something like that would that be enough to keep enough oxygen in the air so I don't pass out or worse?
There's also going to be a concern too if the house is sold sometime in the future when I am not around and no one gets told how air tight that room is and they use it for a bedroom or something.
Well crap. I think I just talked myself into figuring out a way of getting an air return set up in that room. Better safe than sorry.
David
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hibb wrote:

Could you just put a vent to an adjoining room that isn't likely to be occupied while you're recording? Basically just poke a hole in a wall?
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

There are metal ducts that are lined with fiberglass insulation. It is thermal insulation but would probably absorb sound well. If there were a couple 90 degree bends my guess is minimal sound would get through. I think there are also rectangular ducts made of fiberglass insulation.
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Just a comment: Every kilowatt of equipment = 3300 BTU. Each human body = approx. 300 BTU (maybe more if active?) Each 100 watt bulb or equivalent = 330 BTU ............... etc. etc. Considering that typical bedroom in this cold climate has a 1500 watt electric heater which is on about 60% of the time (in coldest weather) giving 1.5 x 3300 x 0.6 = about 3000 BTUs; could be like a furnace in there?
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I guess I could install a vent in the ceiling and run a long line of insulated ductwork with several bends to another vent in the ceiling above the stairs since I will be remodeling that area next. That should not conduct much sound at all.
Thanks, David
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hibb wrote:

Hi, Most door I know of has air gap at the botom of the door. You mean this is not the case? Your door is air tight against the floor? I never saw 100% air tight room in residential buildings.
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Well, the idea of creating a recording studio is to close every gap you can. For example, I will be attaching something called resilient channel to the wood framing and attaching the first layer of 5/8 drywall to the resilient channel so there is not much of a hard connection between the drywall and the wood. Then I will apply another layer of 5/8 drywall over that but separated with an adhesive called Green Glue.
There is one window in the room so I will leave the, not very old, double hung window in place and insulate around it the best I can and then, because of the extra thickness of the drywall, I will build up the inside window frame and box in that whole window with a single piece of extra thick glass.
The bottom of the door will not exactly reach the threshold but there will be a gasket or rubber flap or something on the bottom to close that gap.
Thanks, David
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hibb wrote:

Hi, Our recording room is in the basement surrounded by think pelt fabric pretty dead sound chamber. We do guitar, drum recording with multi-track digital set up. We(me and my son) are non-pro but can produce decent amateur recordings turning into CD just for fun.
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hibb wrote:

There's enough Oxygen in an average room to supply several people for days.
If you're concerned, you could get a canary.
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wrote:

I saw a canary give mouth to mouth resuscitation. It didn't work.
He couldn't do chest compressions at the same time.
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No return in a airtight room means a stuffy mess. What is total power consumption of everything you will have on, even lights because its all going to be converted to heat, even the Btus people put out. In summer you will need more Btu cooling then before if your walls have been upgraded for sound deadining, you wont need as much extra heat in the winter but you need to move air in and out.
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Why not put some sort of closeable vent in the door, maybe a register outlet cover on both the inside and the outside of the door. Won't look great, but would provide a reasonable air flow when both are open and when both are closed there would be a reasonable sound barrier.
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