roofing and WSU

Nice weather for a change, so I'm tearing off half the roof and reshingling. I've avoided reroofing this because of the 3 to 6 layers up there!
This is all '29 and is boards. Atlanta.
I've got 4 square of WSU to put in the valley and the eaves. Should that also go on the rake edge?
Should I put down flashing under the WSU in the valley?
Will I have any trouble with my nail gun and the boards? There are a lot more seams in board roofing.
I'll be putting down drip edge. Should the shingles extend 1/2" beyond that? Rake and Eaves?
Underlayment is in good shape except for the bottom of the valley near the eave. OSB is not OK? Plywood? Amazingly no felt paper. But felt paper was never required here. I'll be putting down 15#.
I'll be using cut valleys, which seems to be the norm here. Anything else I should be careful of?
Jeff
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Check out the new plastic felt replacements. Stuff is perfect for slow roofers (DIY) as it tolerates months of exposure. Much better and safer to walk around on, too. Seems to be the material choice around here (central midwest). The only roofing I've seen with ordinary felt in the last two years has been a prebuilt garage. Use plywood whenever possible (holds nails better) and Grace watershield in all the right places, valleys, etc. Locally, woven valleys are the norm for better wind resistance, I suppose. Also, thick tab shingles have replaced all the old skinny ones except on tract houses in the outer developments being peddled to kids that don't know any better. Have your shingle supplier deliver the bundles to the roof top to save you time and grief. Your vertebrae will appreciate it.
Joe
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On 1/28/2011 1:15 PM, Joe wrote:

It doesn't seem to be popular here. I looked into it and the roofing supply sold me 15# felt. Oddly, the city requires nothing. The roof is not steep, few snow loads, so that may be why. Maybe I'll do the other half in it, if I find it!
Much better and

OK.
and Grace watershield in all the right

Grace is a special order here. Got something the supply house said was about as good, and a lot less expensive.
Locally, woven valleys are the norm for better

I've got 25 square of architectural coming in the morning. $50/square. 30 year. Sounds cheap to me. $60 to deliver it through a third party. Some kind of builders surplus or such...

I'm sure! And I wish! I've got a pair of "Slims" helping. I'm doing half at a time. I've got a "dog house" on the other side. The roof sinks in toward this and I think I'll either have to jack it up or use lots of WSU.
Thanks, Jeff

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That's only a few more layers than the maximum you're supposed to have. I don't think I've ever seen more than four. Maybe that's because after that the roof tends to sit down on the job!

It's not a bad idea. Wind-driven rain can get under the shingles sometimes, but it's not a big risk in general. Just remember that the drip edge goes under the underlayment at the eaves, and on top of the underlayment at the rake edges.

Flashing? You mean like metal flashing? Metal flashing usually goes over the adhesive membrane and is left exposed, as in an open valley. I think when you say cut valley, you're talking about a closed valley where only one side is cut, right? That's called a closed cut valley. Just want to make sure we understand each others' terms. A closed cut valley does not need or benefit from metal flashing. Just line the valley with self-adhesive membrane, and then shingle.
BTW, the acronym WSU threw me. If you Google it you'll see there are very, very few hits for WSU that don't have to do with a university.

The odds are better than fair to middling that you will find a gap between boards lining up with your preferred roofing nail location line. If you have to move the nail line a little further up, it's probably not a problem unless you're in a high wind area.

Yes. Yes.

You're confusing some terms. Sheathing is the plywood or OSB. Underlayment is either 15# (or 30#) building paper, or self-adhesive membrane such as Ice & Water Shield.

Follow the directions on the shingle bundles and it's pretty much a piece of cake. Code usually defers to the shingle manufacturers' instructions. The only places you'll run into some head-scratching is around the dormer you mentioned in your subsequent post. Most likely what happened with that doghouse dormer is that they didn't double up the rafters at the dormer side walls, or even more likely, all of that extra weight of those extra layers has exceeded the rafters' design capacity. Not sure if you realize how extreme you situation is, but those extra layers are well beyond your roof design loads. Codes used to allow three layers, and now most jurisdictions don't allow more than one additional layer before you have to strip the roof down to the sheathing.
BTW, you won't find a single shingle manufacturer that does not require underlayment. If you omit the underlayment you automatically void your warranty.
R
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On 1/28/2011 8:26 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Yeah, I know. Everyone who looked at it says: "Wow." I've previously down good bits of it, mostly on the side with dog house I'm doing later.

I'm thinking of running the ice dam around all the edges and down the valley, and then covering the remainder with 15# felt with some overlap over the ice dam. Does that sound about right? Or should I run the felt over the ice dam except in the valley?
BTW, I wound up using the plywood I had which I had on hand. One of the Slims cut it up while I was picking up the shingles. There's a half sheet of oak up there with some cheaper birch. Slaps head!@#

This part of the roof I did long ago. It is only 1 layer. And I think it is just one rafter for each wall. I'll post up questions on this later. I've certainly thrown a lot of tar and shingle and flashing against the dog house to little avail. Getting the water to run away from the dormer is a better idea, I think. That and ice shield which I didn't know about then.
Not sure if you realize how extreme you situation is, but

OK.
I think I did good with the shingles. 35 year Atlas Pinnacle (made here in Atlanta last November, with algae protection) for $50/square. That's better than I was expecting!
Thanks.
Jeff

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