Roofing a new shed- 1/2 inch more roof than shingles, what to do?

I built a shed in the back yard, but upon beginning to roof it I find that the roof is 1/2 inch wider than three shingles laid end to end. What do I do with this? Cut a 1/2 inch piece and insert it into the row of shingles? Cut the offending 1/2 off of the roof with a circular saw? (yeah, right!) I obviously have no idea of how to deal with this situation. Somebody, please help me. Ignorant, and trying not to be stupid.
Dave
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Okay, I may already have the answer, or at least part of it. Upon reflection I realized I did not stagger the first row of shingles, I laid them right on top of the reversed (upside down) shingles that I laid down first. Have to undo that, and stagger the replacement shingles, leaving a 1/8 inch or so between adjacent shingles. Is this how it's done? Again, I would really like someone who has done this to give me some feedback and help me toward the right answer. Thanks for any help.
Dave
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 7:38:48 AM UTC-5, Dave wrote:

There should be instructions with the shingles and at the manufacturers website. Also plenty of videos. You should not leave 1/8" between shingles. To deal with having only 1/2" left at one end, you can start the pattern with a partial shingle, say 2/3's of one, instead of a full one. Just make sure to follow rules for correct spacing of joints verus the previous course.
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THANK YOU for your reply. And I realized that I could place 1/3 shingles in between the three I am placing, which would also serve to give me som eoverhang on each end. And yes, I believe I understand about staggering the joints on each progressive row as compared to the last and previous rows. God I hate being so ignorant about something that ouht to be plain and simple. Will check out some videos to see what else I don't know. Thanks agaian. I will get this done.
Dave
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 9:47:35 AM UTC-5, Dave wrote:

I would not insert a part shingle in the middle. It will screw up the look of the shingles, unless of course you do it exactly right. It's very easy to just start the first course with the appropriate shingle that;s less than a full one, if necessary to avoid a thin strip at the end.
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Hi Dave,

As Trader_4 mentioned, cut off part of your first shingle to offset the row. Then you'll have a larger piece leftover when you get to the other end. Offset the next row so the joints end up in the middle of each lower shingle (for a simple running bond pattern).
For a small roof like yours, the easiest way to figure out how much to cut off the first shingle is to mock up the first couple of rows on the ground. Lay out the two rows like you want them on the roof, then use a tape measure to figure out the width of the roof. Then measure that width on the shingles, shifting left or right to find the starting offset that gives you the largest tabs on each end (trying to avoid tiny pieces at each end). Then cut off the appropriate amount for the shingle that starts each row. This is a lot easier than trying to figure things out up on the roof when shingles are already nailed on.

Each strip of shingles should butt up directly against the previous strip. The shingles are designed with half slots on each end so they result in the same size full slot when butted together.
Also, the gaps of your inverted starter strip should be offset at least 2- 4" from the joints in the first row of shingles. You don't want the slots between tabs to land over the joints in the starter strips.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:26:00 AM UTC-8, Dave wrote:

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You have already found the answer "start with less than a full shingle" Ho w much less? That depends on the look you want. The package will tell you haw much to cut off the first shingle to get two different looks. One wil l end up with the cut-outs running straight up the roof. The other will en d up with the cut-outs running at an angle up the roof USE THAT ONE. I no longer have a bundle left so I can't give you a size but it will be on your bundles. Look at roofs in your area and almost all of them will have the cut-offs going up the roof in an angel.
Roofs with the cut-outs running straight up the roof are bad for two reason s
1. It is a sure sign that an amateur roofer laid it - no professional woul d. 2. Any errors in laying will be very obvious.
Be sure to start each row from the same end, save the cut-offs from the las t shingle, some of them will be long enough to use later as you go up the r oof.
DO NOT INSERT A SHORT SHINGLE IN THE MIDDLE OF A ROW.
Harry K
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:26:00 AM UTC-8, Dave wrote:

If you haven't done so, put on 'drip edges' before laying that first upside down layer.
Harry K
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:26:00 AM UTC-8, Dave wrote:

You have already found the answer "start with less than a full shingle" How much less? That depends on the look you want. The package will tell you haw much to cut off the first shingle to get two different looks. One will end up with the cut-outs running straight up the roof. The other will end up with the cut-outs running at an angle up the roof USE THAT ONE. I no longer have a bundle left so I can't give you a size but it will be on your bundles. Look at roofs in your area and almost all of them will have the cut-offs going up the roof in an angel.
Roofs with the cut-outs running straight up the roof are bad for two reasons
1. It is a sure sign that an amateur roofer laid it - no professional would. 2. Any errors in laying will be very obvious.
Be sure to start each row from the same end, save the cut-offs from the last shingle, some of them will be long enough to use later as you go up the roof.
DO NOT INSERT A SHORT SHINGLE IN THE MIDDLE OF A ROW.
Harry K
Hey Harry, Thanks for the input. I'm not sure what you mean by having the cut-outs running up at a angle. Or straight up and down, for that matter. Are you talking about the "notches" at the end of each shingle, that work together to keep things "looking right"? If I cut six inches off of the first shingle, that will do what you are talking about won't it? I really am trying to get this right. It's going to be staring me down for the next 20 or so years.
Thanks again. And BTW, I decided to come inside and get out my Home Improvement 1-2-3 book from Home Depot, which has a section on laying asphalt shingles. This whole thing is not as simple as I thought it was. :)
Dave
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 9:14:27 AM UTC-8, Dave wrote:

Yes the 'cut-outs' are those notches on 3-tab shingles. I don't recall the amount to cut off the starting shingle to get the effect. One way winds up with them lined up straight up the roof, the other (and best for looks) run up at an angle.
The book is thie best way to go, you get pictures to help with the explanations.
Harry K
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