Roofer Doing Poor Job?

I chose a reputable roofing contractor who has been around over 50 years and comes highly recommended. I am questioning a few things:
Day 1: they ripped off one full side of the roof, replaced all the plywood (it was all in bad shape) and nailed down felt paper.
Day 2: they didn't show up due to rain in the forecast, but there was no rain, and they could have gotten all the shingles down over that dry felt paper if they were here.
Day 3: it rained lightly overnight and continues to rain lightly. They are now nailing the shingles over the wet felt paper.
They tell me it is no problem if the felt is wet, the heat of the sun (whenever it comes back) will dry it. But I have read that it is not a good idea to lay shingles in damp or wet weather. Am I wrong?
I am also a bit concerned that they left the shingle packages outside and some were ripped partially open, so that some of them will be wet at the time they are installed. I am using CertainTeed Landmark 30 year alphalt shingles.
Are there any risks from installing the roof in this weather? It's also a bit cool (49 degrees). Is there anything to look for when the job is done that could be a sign of trouble? Should I put something in writing when signing off on the job to indicate my concerns?
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All good so far.

Coulda, woulda, shoulda. You're Monday morning quarterbacking a business owner's decision whether to risk having to pay guys for the day if they get rained out. Not all construction workers are salaried.

Light rain is not a problem. I personally don't like to work on a wet roof, even a lightly wet roof.

It's done all of the time and rarely causes a problem. The biggest potential problem is that the roofing paper will absorb water, wrinkle and the shingles won't lay flat. Since it just rained and they were essentially shingling at the same time, and since you are using heavier architectural shingles, it's not a worry.

Shingles are waterproof - both top and bottom. Water won't hurt them. If the bundles of shingles had been left in the sun, and the sealing strips had glued the shingles together you'd have something to worry about. Well, not really, since the roofer is probably supplying their own materials you are not responsible for that either.

That is a perfect temperature for shingling. Too cold and they crack, too hot and the roofers' boots chew up the shingles.
You seem to be nervous about this roofer and nothing you have written indicates a real cause for concern. Is there some reason the contractor makes you nervous?
R
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wrote:

No, I'm just a nervous guy :)
In fact the owner seems like an honest, trustworthy guy who knows what he is doing.
It's been a steady rain and they continue to work through it. I guess I'll stop worrying now...
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You'd mentioned it was a reroof, and that the roof sheathing had been replaced. That pretty much eliminates the only real problem you'd be likely to have - if you had sprayed polyurethane insulation filling the rafter bays, the roof could only dry out from above and whatever moisture reached the framing would stay there almost indefinitely. You don't have that problem.
When you think about it, if construction could only be performed only in ideal conditions there would probably be only 100 houses completed a year.
R
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