Roof valleys are leaking

My valleys are deteriorated and leaking. Roof is asphault shingles. I don't know the terminology but the valley is not the woven shingle type. It's a continuous piece of asphault with aluminum flashing underneath. The roof, about 12 years old. The rest of the roof looks ok. How do I fix it? Do I have to remove (and replace) one shingle either side the whole lenght of the valley to do it right? John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JOHN D wrote:

Depending on what sort of shingles you've got up there and their condition, you may be looking at a new roof, not just a repair. Can you place some pictures on a web site and post a link here? It'll help with the diagnosis.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JOHN D wrote: Do I

the valley. The whole length, yes. Keep your new fasteners at least 6 inches away from the valley intersection, and cut your "ears"(the points of the shingles that extend into the valley proper). Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom wrote:

Probably easier to just replace the entire roof and all other flashing.
Was all the flashing replaced 12 years ago? People cheap out and replace roof and not flashing, then have trouble later.
anyone walk up that valley? that can cause leaks, never walk on valleys!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I haven't actually been up there for a close look, but the house was new 12 years ago so it was all new flashing and roof then. The house was built by an owner/builder who is works in the building trades and is very picky about how he does things. My theory is that the asphalt across the valley bridged an air gap between it and the aluminum flashing below which, without contact with it's backing, allowed it to get hotter than the rest of the roof and deteriorate faster. From the ground the rest of the roof looks like new. The valleys have holes where you can see the aluminum. I doubt that anyone walked on the valleys cus the house has only been occupied by me and the builder and all 3 valleys have the same damage. I've not confirmed the valleys are leaking but something is and they look bad. There's a place where a gutter from a higher roof discharges onto a roof plane below which is near the spot where the water comes in. Repairs I can do but a whole roof is too big a job for me. Sometime this week Ill go up for a closer look and maybe post some pictures if I can figure out where to post them. John

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JOHN D wrote:

waer from above erodes the roof below and causes leaks....
what part of the country are you in?
pittsburgh roofs go 20 to 25 years, my dads in phoenix, out there 10 to 15 is considered fantastic the sun does them in...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm in Northern Indiana John

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JOHN D wrote:

house, and used the aluminum valley as a base for cutting shingles. this scored it, and 10 years later it broke on the scores. at any rate, i ripped the shingles in the valley right up in a 3 foot swath, applied ice and water shield, and put in a W flashing which is left exposed. fairly typical way to do a valley in these parts. the worst part of the job is i had to use new shingles which stick out like a sore thumb. you might be able to take a skilsaw with an old blade and cut on either side of the valley, and slide a W flashing in there. you'd want to tar the shingles to it. not ideal, but might save you from doing the whole roof. it would take some carefull surgery and a helper or two to get the flashing in there but i think it could be done. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good point some shingles MUST be replaced..
If your planning on selling the home before the roof will need replaced now is the time to do it....
a neighbor had some replaced about 8 years ago after a tree came down in a storm its still very noticeable she is planning on selling and mentioned its one of her must do list.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had the same problem, at about the same age. (In Syracuse NY.) The story I've gotten (from multiple sources, but that doesn't mean it's true) is that the 90# RR just isn't the same quality as the shingles. So, it fails faster. When we did it originally, we put steel (not Alum), then 18" wide RR (upside down), then full 36" RR. There wasn't a gap. All the valleys went at about the same time.
I pulled the RR out, and re-shingled the valleys, fitting new shingles into the rest of the roof. It was a PITA to do - where the new shingle weave into the older ones, you have get under the ones you're keeping, to pull nails and then to nail underneath when you're done. It's easier on a warm day.
Looking around, I see that (a) many RR valleys are failing, and (b) more and more ppl are using woven valleys.
George
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.