Roof repair

What temperature is not advisable to install asphalt roof shingles?
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I would say the hotter it gets the better chance that the shingles will soften too much. It can be a warm day but not too warm. Does the shingle manufacturer have any info on proper installation procedures?
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To mikeytag,
"...It can be a warm day but not too warm". What the hell does THAT mean. Not much help at all, is it?
Then there's your "...Does the shingle manufacturer have any info on proper installation procedures?" If the original poster had that information, he would be asking questions here now, would he?

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Craven Morehead wrote:

Critiquing other posts without adding information isn't particularly helpful.
To the OP: Generally I don't want to be on a roof if it's over 90 degrees. If the weather is really hot and there's no available shade, start work very early, knock off for the hottest part of the day and do another hour or two at dusk when it's cooled some and the sun isn't beating down. It stays brighter longer up on a roof so you can generally work pretty late. I've set up lights on occasion. The neighbors have called the cops occasionally on one of my occasions.
If you're the one doing the work, wear non-abusive footwear and store the shingles in the shade and bring the shingles up as you need them. Pro roofers might have a problem with not fully loading the roof at the time of delivery.
R
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I disagree. The shingles will seal just fine the next hot day that comes around. If you walk on hot shingles, you'll wreck them, not to mention it's hotter 'n hell up there in the sun. Also, since the shingles are soft, if you're using a pneumatic roofing nail gun, you could go right through them!

Jeb
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I respectfully disagree and HAD to get my new roof replaced because it was installed in too cold of weather:(
Shingles never sealed or laid flat properly.
I have a friend who is a roofer in pittsburgh, he said mid summer is best.
perhaps mid summer in phoenix at 120 degrees isnt so good?
around here 90 is about tops temp wise
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Here on the Texas Gulf Coast, the number of days where the LOW temp of the day is BELOW 40F can be counted on all fingers of both hands. The number of days in the year where the HIGH temp does not exceed 40F can be counted on the fingers of ONE hand in most years.
April thru September daily high temps are in the 90s. So roofers must work mornings and late evenings.
Average high temps in Phoenix are a bit higher than here, but 120 is a rare event Even Palm Springs is only a degree or two hotter than Phoenix, and days with 120 temps are NOT frequent in the summer
Both Phoenix and Palm Springs are MUCH drier than here, so 110 is not the pain that 95 degrees is here. We frequently see 90+/90+ days in the summer. The air has WEIGHT here.
I've been in Palm Springs and Palm Desert in the summer when the temps were hitting over 115. It felt BETTER than here in Houston TX at 95 F with 90% RH
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Robert Gammon wrote:

Humidity doesn't affect roof shingle installation nor sealing.
On a tangent, there was a table on joint compound drying time (drying type, not setting) and in a place with 95 degrees 95 percent humidity it can take several months to dry. "Okay, we finished the first coat of spackling today. We'll be back in about three or four months to check whether we need to wait another month or two for the second coat. Enjoy the house!" ;)
R
R
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