Roof flashing problems

Hi folks.
I am getting bids for reroofing (hail damage), and I am having trouble getting these guys to include flashing work in their bids. I don't think they want to deal with it.
If you have a minute, could you look at this web page I made, and give me your thoughts? There are some pictures of my roof flashing etc.
http://procyonlotor1.tripod.com/flashing.html
Thanks!!!
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Roof conditions well documented. A number of apparent problems. Find an established contractor willing to deal with the flashing. If you want to put the money into it, find an architect or forensic architect to document & provide details which you or your family can use over time.
The "soft deck" suggests a complete tear off and some deck replacement, so a careful flashing job would be in order.
TB
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On Sun, 02 Oct 2005 06:59:52 GMT, "spoon2001"

You've done a very good job of picturing and describing your job.
I'll take them in the order in which you posted your pictures: 1. This seems to have been done well. The old roof cement on the flashings can be chipped off and it works best when it is cold as the stuff is quite brittle at low temperatures. The gap between the old caulk and mortar can be filled in with a urethane caulk such as NP-1, which will last a very long time. Every course of shingles must be installed with a step flashing that goes under the shingle and behind the flashings installed into the mortar. 2. See item number one. 3. See item number one. 4. Either the trim boards must be adjusted or larger metal drip edge installed. 5. The only problem I see here is, counting from the left, the second plumbing vent flashing isn't installed correctly. It is over two shingles and under one. Less than half the flashing is covered by the shingle above it. Unless it is well sealed underneath, water can travel, under just the right circumstances, to the hole cut through the decking and cause a leak. 6. I'll address the rust issue later... 7. See item number 6. 8. See item number 6. 9. See item number 6. 10. The reason the lower pitched section is roofed with soldered metal is it the pitch is too shallow for wood shingles or three tab composition shingles. The soldered metal roof can be retained if the seams are in good condition and if it is properly maintained (See item number 6.) 11. You are most likely correct in your assessment. Often times installers are lazy. Caulking an area like this is faster than doing it correctly...and it only lasts about five years or less before you end up with a leak. 12. See item number one. 13. In the past, the step flashings used were of the size you have pictured. Now they are typically 4X4X8, at least that is the most common size I've seen. As to the gap between the end of the shingle and the step flashing, I prefer to have a small space in this area because it allows water to drain well. 14. See item number 6. 15. If properly done, a cricket is not needed in this location. Using one piece of metal and no tin snips, it is possible to fashion a flashing with no seams or cuts in it, but it takes some patience and experience to make it. 16. The torn ridge shingle looks like tree damage, although it could be from wind or animals (such as a raccoon.) Some decking may need to be replaced, but that isn't very difficult. 17. No problems there.
Overall your roof isn't that difficult. Rust on galvanized metal is to be expected and is normal. None of the rusting you have pictured is atypical. With proper maintenance this can be controlled. If you desire, you can treat the rust with a rust neutralizer and then paint with any good grade of exterior enamel, although I'd suggest you stay away from latex for this application. Maintaining the paint on the soldered metal roof is particularly important so as to keep the seams in good condition.
With all the flashings at the chimneys and walls you have lots of places where an improperly done job can cause you leaks. I would recommend that a bead of roof cement be placed between (under) the shingle and step flashing on each course of these areas for extra insurance (and that is SOP on all of our jobs.) The bead of roof cement is under the shingle and out of sight, but it forms a water tight seal to the metal of the step flashing. I even recommend every roof vent and jack be done this way. It is easy to do when installing the roof and the cost of a few tubes of roof cement is minimal. Of particular importance are the corners on any and all chimneys. These should be done with either a specially fashioned piece of flashing or a good urethane sealer such as the previously mentioned NP-1.
With a good paint job, I don't see anything suspect with the roof vents and jacks. Sure, they can be replaced, but unless they are in particularly poor condition there is no real need. There is no need at all to replace the lead plumbing vents as they will outlast the next roof you have installed. Especially don't let anyone replace them with the kind that has a rubber, or neoprene, seal. Those seals only last about five years before they crack and cause a leak. If you prefer, you may have some of the roof vents replaced with aluminum vents that will not rust. The middle vent in picture number six is easily replaced with this kind of flashing. The furnace and water heater, double walled pipes require roof jacks that, so far, I've only seen out of galvanized, unless you want to do what I suggest in the next paragraph and pay tons more to have copper jacks made. The only problem then is you have to make sure the copper does not come into contact with a different kind of metal as this will cause corrosion and premature failure of the parts in contact with each other.
Unless you want to pay quite a bit more, the existing galvanized flashings that are mortared in can be reused. If you have deep pockets, you can have copper flashings made and installed, with copper fasteners, that won't rust and will last the life of the home. Otherwise I'd suggest simply painting them ever five or six years to keep the rust to a minimum. Besides, it gives you a chance to inspect the roof for any unsuspected damage or problems that may not have shown up inside the house...
Hope this helps.
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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John, thanks very much for your reply ... it was very, very helpful. I understand the problems much better now.
Just out of curiosity, why would they have put roofing cement on the bottom of the cap flashing? Doesn't cap flashing normally just overlap the step flashing underneath it, without any use of cement?
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to John Willis and John especially - thanks very much for the information and opinions. You have helped me to understand the problem a lot better. I posted a thank you ealier but I've noticed my new news server isn't very reliable.
Any ideas why there is roofing cement at the bottom of the cap flashing? Maybe at one point there was no step flashing underneath, the cap flashing might have been in direct contact with the original roofing below?
John - I'd get up there and chip off that old roofing cement myself - unfortunately I'm in Texas and it's HOT up there, and you said it's best to do when the material is cold and brittle.
Thanks again, very, very much.
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On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 04:16:56 GMT, "spoon2001"

From the looks of it, the step flashing you have is original to one of the cedar roofs that has been on the home. That house has been roofed many times. At least one of those times the installers merely butted the shingles up to the flashings and before leaving the job put down a bead of roof cement. That eventually failed and another layer of roof cement was put on top of the old. Repeat the last step at least a couple of more times and now you see why it looks the way it does.

Being in Texas as well (and finishing a roof this evening) I know about hot weather in Texas. If you get up early it is cool enough to make removing that excess material easy. At very cold temperatures it can actually shatter just by tapping on it with a hammer.

Any time.
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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spoon2001 wrote:

Have you checked with your insurance company? Is the roof covered? Will they cover the flashing (which clearly should be replaced, but does not appear to have been hail damaged)?
When I replaced my roof from hail damage the insurance adjuster made a few recommendations and I found them good to work with and they did a good job.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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"spoon2001" wrote

First, I would've loved this type of roof, when I used to do detailing. I got "stuck" doing detail work for 14 years, and I loved every challenging moment.
I agree with John Willis on some points like, the shingles aren't run over the jack flashing enough, and you want a channel along when covering meets step flashing, so the water flows, and debris doesn't collect. Also, about putting sealant under the material at step flashing.
But, that cap/counter flashing would be ripped off there, with new counter& step installed (I couldn't imagine leaving that horrendous material on there). The counter shouldn't be all the way down to roof covering, instead you should have at least 1/2" to 3/4" above the step flashing. The counter should overlap each previous piece by 2". The pieces should be uniform in size, but would be a challenge, since the stone doesn't look uniform. The bottom of the counter flashing should always line up with the proceeding piece, so you have a nice straight edge going up the roof-line. A crease should be put in each piece of counter, to stiffen. Typical pieces of pre-bent step flashing are 5"x7" for a standard shingle, usually bent so 3" up juncture, and 2" onto roof covering, the 7" is the area of a standard shingle that is covered, which is where the step flashing is installed. I always preferred to bend my own step with 3-1/2" up wall, 2-1/2" under material). On metric roof covering, bending your own is essential, otherwise you end up doubling up step flashing, because the "hidden" part of the covering is larger than 7". A standard rule of thumb in roofing, is all overlaps always overlap at least 2", if not more. New cuts can be put in the mortar joints, which the flashing should slip into.
The pitch on the soldered roof can easily be found, if same type of roof covering can be used, it should be used.
The dead zone behind the chimney, would be a nightmare if you get freezing weather. This spot is asking for trouble if ice dams occur. A couple of 2"x material, a compound cut or two, and a small piece of plywood, this spot can be eliminated, with the water running free away from the dead zone.
One can only guess of why the drip edge is like it is. You say "lathe or slats showing", one can only assume since this had a cedar roof on it b/4, the entire deck was re-decked with plywood or OSB. Once the roof was torn off, it would be safe to say, one could figure out the best approach so this area isn't exposed. Could trim back the over hanging sheathing, or wider fascia board, or ?
Good luck on finding someone to do it right.
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