Roof estimate questions

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From your replies to the various comments people have made, it sounds like you have a decent roofer lined up. Hope it works out for you.
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Red Green wrote:

Thanks. It definitely helped having the input I received here before I met with the roofer again on Saturday. I had a chance to go over more details and he seemed to be right on the money on everything. Plus, I got more info on his background and experience, and it turns out that he worked for a lot of years for another roofer that I know (who now only does large commercial roofing jobs) before he started his own company. He said he'll be doing my job late this week or the beginning of next week, so I'll post back how it goes.
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I've never heard of 8 ply 1/2" for building, that's not saying it's not available.
Generally, when replacing existing 1/2", we would go with 4 ply over the 3 ply. You do not want 3 ply. Someone made reference for hurricane clips between the sheets. Those are _not_ hurricane clips, but "H" clips required for proper spacing between the sheets & a code requirement for movement such as expansion/contraction. It does stiffen up the sheets. Never had I seen 3/4" specified for 24" O.C. spacing, although 5/8" is quite common. 3/4" may be required in some areas, but sounds like over-kill from what I was used to.
The 1" material would come off in our area, our code would not allow one to go over it with plywood. Your code may be different. There's a load factor involved, which may cause a problem years down the road if/when someone wants to do a roof over.
There is quite a few details missing, you want details to protect yourself & to avoid conflicts. IMHO, GAF Shingle Mate 15 lb underlayment blows away 30 lb felt for underlayment. It is almost the same in price per roll, however you get 4 sq per roll of GAF vs 2 sq per roll of 30lb. The Shingle Mate lays much flatter than 30 lb. Some don't like to use it, simply because it has fiberglass in it, and they get the itches. Or, they never heard of it because they don't buy through a building/roofing supplier. Truly a better product tho.
On your iceguard, you need to make sure it is specified on where they will put it, and how much of it. When installing along the eave edge, it needs to be at least 2 ft on the inside of the building envelope. It comes in a 3 ft roll. So, if you have a 2 ft overhang, one width wouldn't even get it to 1 ft inside the envelope. Other areas where it should be installed, you can look up on the net, a lot quicker than I can type it.
On ridge vent, you need it specified how much they will use, and the brand. I've seen roofers throw a 8 ft section across a 40 ridge, and tell the customer, there's their ridge vent. You also want intake to go along with your ridge vent. This is done through soffit ventilation. Again, you can look up faster than I can type.
You need them to specify how much overhang of the shingles they will do. Along with are they installing drip edge, some locals don't require it. I'm a believer in it. You don't want shingle material cut flush with any edge, eave or rake edge.
Details, details, details, you can't have too many specifications.
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And yes, drip edge (on all edges, eaves and rakes) which I totally failed to mention but wasn't really trying to make an all-inclusive post. I've made plenty of bucks replacing fascia boards and none of the houses had drip edge. And depending on location depends on the drip edge. 2-3" drip edge is fine in NC but in northern VT I used 8" galvanized (which goes up the roof about 6" if I recall) and that's not overkill there.
And let's hope the roofer knows the WSU (Waterproof Shingle Underlayment, aka ice shield) goes on top of the drip edge.
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There is an 8 ply plywood that is flatter than the regular grade, smoother, and seems to flex a little less. I'd not pay the much higher price for it though, as it is not needed for a roof deck.

Some roofers used 30 pound felt and no ice shield, but the ice shield is better, at least in cold climates.
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Pull a permit, you get a free inspection and dont pay till it passes. An inspector can help alot if the guy is cheating you. Flashing a chimney is one area most get ripped off, the flashing should be recessed into cuts into the mortar in the chimney, not caulked to it which fails prematurely in 5-10 years. Is he a hack, the local court house will have any suits filed, I made a mistake of hiring a guy that lost about a case a year, nobody could collect because the house and Mercedes was in the wifes name, the judgement I recieved is worthless.
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Pull a permit, you get a free inspection and dont pay till it passes. An inspector can help alot if the guy is cheating you.
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Maybe, maybe not. I've seen a couple of jobs where a permit was pulled. In one case, the inspector drove by to make sure the permit was correct (it was a $60,000 commercial job) and paid for, on the other residential, the inspector never even drove by. .
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Thanks all. This is an excellent newsgroup and I really do appreciate all of the help, suggestions, etc.
I met with the roofer this morning and it helped to be able to ask him about some of the things that were mentioned. After going over it all, I decided to use him to do the job and he'll be doing it in the next week to 10 days. In his estimate he didn't ask for any deposit, which is good because I don't do deposits on jobs like this that can be done in a day or two. The estimate says payment upon completion, which is what I almost always do.
The house is an old style, side-by-side "twin", 2 story plus walk-up attic, with sloping roofs and two dormers, one in the front and one on the side. I own my half of the twin and another owner owns the other half/side. As far as what is already there, I bought it as a bank-owned property and the prior owner(s) had cedar shakes then at least two asphalt roofs on top of that -- one black and one green.
The estimate did say "Replace C3 1/2 aluminum drip edge to all roof edges", plus new seamless gutters and downspouts. I am in New Jersey so it is not a high wind or hurricane area. He will be doing full ridge vents on the two dormers. The very top of the roof has a small square section where each of the four sides slope up at a gradual slope and meet at a shorter ridge/peak -- maybe 5 or 6 feet long. That section has a metal roof in good shape and will be recoated with fibered asphalt roof coating. He said he won't know for sure until he gets back up there if he could do a ridge vent on that part due to the metal roof and the very gradual slope on that part. But, he said if he can't do that, he'll put a "square vent" up there. I asked about what goes in the valleys and I think he said ice shield (but I'm not sure) which he described and something that gets laid down across both sides of the valley and sticks to the wood and goes under the siding. He is getting the permit.
Jay-T wrote:

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