Roof / Drip Edge / Fascia

My house was built in 1978; I bought it seven years ago. About four years ago I started having problems with water getting into my (large) crawlspace. I've read a good bit, including "drip edge" posts in this group. There is about a 3/4" gap between my roof decking and the top of
my wood fascia. From my reading, it appears that the drip-edge was not installed. I think water is getting into the blockwork via the gap. The
gutters seem to be pretty tight against the fascia, but maybe that's misleading.
Is my assumption correct re: the gap and drip edge? If not, do I need to fill the gap by adding a small board atop the fascia? Or, maybe, make a custom-bend of aluminum to act as both drip-edge and gap-plugger? I've had a home inspector out here a couple of times over the years. He
never mentioned this, so I've sort-of assumed the gap was normal construction. If this is a problem, I don't want to solve it by re-roofing. The bucks
aren't there. And I think I need to get to work soon with wet weather coming on quickly.
My thanks to any kind soul with helpful suggestions.
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I read this a couple of times. What I think I read is that your home is block construction and you think water may be getting into the block from the roofline.
Clarify that for me and others.
Most water in the crawlspace comes from no gutters, gutters dumping without a splash block or improper grading of a yard to get the water away from the house. Check these first
Houses on hill sides sometimes receive water from above and there is the occasional wet weather spring to contend with.
Awaiting your response.
Colbyt
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Thank you for your reply. Sorry for the lack of clarity. You are correct in your assumption. When there is a hard rain, or even just a good steady one, water gets into my crawlspace (actually a large, unfinished basement with dirt floor). My house has blockwork on stepped footings. When I bought the house there was not a square inch of efflorescence on the blockwork. About two years after the purchase, efflorescence appeared on most of the blockwork. I need to re-grade along the front of the house (the side with the worst water problem). But, it's not as if there is a severe grade running down to the front. The grade goes downhill into the neighbor's property. Anyway, my downspouts do empty onto splashblocks that angle away from the house. My gutters are tight against the fascia and do angle toward the downspouts. (Of course, I might be looking at a matter of degree being part of the problem here). The asphalt shingles have drooped down but are pretty-much aimed at the middle of the gutter valley, so it doesn't seem (to this admittedly ignorant homeowner) that water running behind the gutter would likely be the problem. My area gets some monsterous gully-washers in spring and summer. When those come I often have running water in the crawlspace. Can this really be the result of water pressure from groundwater? (The water does seem to exit the blockwork/footings into the crawlspace below ground level). I'm going to do the tar / visquine / french drain thing along the front next spring just to be on the safe side. But, I was assuming that the rain was getting into the blockwork through the gap between the roof decking and the fascia. (Yep. I know about assumptions.) Thanks for your consideration and response(s).
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Based on this reply I think you have a ground water problem. Some early spring work regarding may solve your problem.
A good test is to lay a hose running full blast on the high side of the area you are having a problem with and then watch where the water goes. Your neighbors like mine did will then you are crazy. You will be surprised at what you learn.
Moving 6" of dirt by however many feet to channel the water may make the difference you need. The water needs to flow away from and around your home.
Colbyt
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I too am a little lost. Do you have a soffit and eave overhang that extends out past the outside wall face? The only way I could see water getting into the block work at the roof line would be due to no overhang. If moisture were getting into the block at the roof line I would expect to see water stains, blistered paint, or other water indications up high, not in the crawl space. If the water were wicking around the shingle edge heading toward the block work, it would rot the fascia first assuming it is not some water proof material.
Colbyt was right on suggesting the problem is more likely to be grade related or gutter/downspout related.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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"Do you have a soffit and eave overhang that extends out past the outside wall face?"
Yes. Again (see reply to Colbyt) I apologize for the confusion. I'm definitely not knowledgeable in these matters. Late last winter I got a construction guy out here and we dug a trench along a small part of the front wall. This part is between the front steps and the garage wall. I expected to see holes, damaged block, erroded mortar or some other way for the water to invade. To my surprise, the blockwork was in excellent shape. (So said the construction guy). As I noted in the previous reply, I'll be doing some work along the longest part of the front of the house next spring (tar / visquine / french drain / re-grade). But, if I don't see damaged blockwork, what could be putting water into my crawlspace at such a rate that I occasionally get running water? (The water doesn't come up from the dirt floor. I've looked into that.) Thanks very much for your consideration.
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